Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
Ryan’s Shed Plans is going to turn you into the ultimate builder – a builder of sheds, a builder of greenhouses, a builder of tiny homes, and a builder of many things. And nope, no previous experience is needed. This unique online program breaks down the steps to building over 12,000 different types of sheds in such a way that anyone can build the shed of their dreams, sans all the frustration and confusion that often comes with most woodworking projects. It’s like a “Building For Dummies” guide that teaches you the accurate steps needed to build everything from a garden shed to a storage shed, greenhouse, and more. So, if you’re tired of finding building plans that are missing steps, that don’t make sense or worse, that don’t accurately list the measurements or tools needed, you need to give Ryan’s Shed Plans a look.
· Tool storage shed — they are used to store the tools that a homeowner may need to maintain their home compounds. They may be installed with ramps at their entrance to make it easier for storage of heavy items. They are also conducive for storage of bicycles and yard tools. Your compound, therefore, looks neat as the untidy yard tools are kept indoors.
· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.
This is nothing but a pyramid scheme in disguise. Don't spend the first $37.00, they lead you to believe that you are getting discs and actual plans until you pay $37.00, then they tell you that you have to download everything but at an additional price. I'm calling the Fraud Department at the Texas State Attorney Generals office and reporting them.

High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

They are the simplest and cheapest sheds one may find. They are easily assembled by regular people, they do not require initial construction knowledge. One may find the DIY kits and plans for these type of sheds. The most common type of sheds is plastic and wooden. They are mainly used to store garden tools, tractors and store items that are considered unsafe to be stored indoors such as gasoline and agricultural chemicals.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is a comprehensive collection of over 12,000 easy to follow, step-by-step Shed and Woodworking Plans. Plus, you are getting an additional 400 Woodworking Plans. What I don’t like about My Shed Plans is I will never ever build a fraction of these Amazing Shed Plans. There is just too many Shed Plans for a weekend warrior like myself.
When you buy this package of shed designs, you have access to the plans for a lifetime. You also get a few bonuses, including a book of professional woodworking tips and extra designs for a variety of woodworking projects. Spend less than $40 today, and you may have what you need to build furniture, toys, sheds and other items for the rest of your life.
If you're excited to start browsing Ryan's shed designs, you're right where I was shortly after finding Ryan Shed Plans. If you can dedicate some time to putting your own shed together and don't mind purchasing the materials from a local store or ordering them online as needed, you will appreciate the thorough instructions provided with each of Ryan's plans. There are so many options that you should have no problem finding a design that fits your needs, and you will have tons of inspiration to fuel future projects as well.
It’s vital to build your shed on a stable, level location—and never in a wet, low-lying area or on a downward slope. And no matter how well a shed is constructed, it won’t hold up on a weak base. A proper foundation is key, one that sets the shed slightly off the ground to aid water drainage and reduce moisture transfer. There are different foundation options, depending on where you live and the size and intended use of the shed, so bone up on the fundamentals and assess your options with this advice from the LP Outdoor Building Solutions team.

Pressure treated sheds, on the other hand, are made out of timber planks that usually have moisture which is sucked out of them using a special cylinder under vacuum conditions. After the moisture is sucked out, a preservative is added to the wood at a relatively high pressure until the preservative is absorbed into the grain, making it an integral part of the wood. This particular type provides around 15-year guarantee as mentioned by the manufacturers even against harsh weather.


I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.


· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.

For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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