A How To Buid A Shed e-Book that comes free with every shed plan order. This e-Book has over 50 pages of illustrations showing each step to building all the roof types shown on our shed building plans, how to frame shed walls, how to frame a shed floor, how to install siding, how to build roof rafters and trusses. It also includes nailing schedules and optional roof details.

The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!


Once redirected to the webpage, I found a bewildering list of links, and downloads. Some were redundant, some didn't work. And I kept trying to figure out where the 12k plans were. I thought for what I paid I should be able to plug in my parameters into a query and get something that remotely looked like an organized list of plans that matched my query. But nada. Nothing. Zilch. Just piles of pdf's tucked seemingly haphazardly into folders here and there, listed in not too logical order in links on a webpage.
I think that we had to purchase some additional hangers that were built especially for bike tires. This system worked pretty well, one comment that I have is that they don't hold up to the weight of several combined bikes as well as I would like. You need to make sure that the track is anchored very often, as having hooks in between anchor points starts to flex the main rail and can result in the hooks popping off.
I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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