If you buy heavy galvanized hardware designed for farm buildings for your shed, it’s overkill. Buy heavy-duty closet door hardware instead. It’s not really meant for outdoor use, but when it’s protected by an overhang, it holds up well. And if the roller bearings get corroded, it’s simple to replace the entire hanger mechanism. Check out Johnson Hardware’s 111 track and 1025 ball-bearing hangers.
Pressure treated sheds, on the other hand, are made out of timber planks that usually have moisture which is sucked out of them using a special cylinder under vacuum conditions. After the moisture is sucked out, a preservative is added to the wood at a relatively high pressure until the preservative is absorbed into the grain, making it an integral part of the wood. This particular type provides around 15-year guarantee as mentioned by the manufacturers even against harsh weather.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
This step by step diy project is about 10×20 gable shed plans. This shed has a beautiful designs, so it is not only for storage but also for enhancing the look of your garden. The access is easy due to the double doors on one end, and a simple door on one side. The double doors will let plenty of light inside the shed. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration. Remember that you need to select the site for the shed with attention and that you have to comply with a few legal regulations.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.) 

Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
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