The plan features not only a cutting list and project diagram. There are also clear instructions starting from building the base and ending with installing the windows and doing the trims. Once you’ve built a small shed like this, you’ll have enough experience to build a bigger one that fits all the garden equipment as well. A tiny shed like this though is a necessary item for every home!
You can even go online and look up prices!  For example, if you visit lowes.com, they have a search box where you can enter in the item and find out each price!  This will save you some time.  The only drawback I see to this is that I find it really beneficial to go to these big box lumber stores and see exactly what I want.  For example, the LP Smartside siding panels I recommend to use:  some stores carry a cheap variation of these that have a brown color to them on the inside of the panel, and this is not what you want!  The have the consistency of a 'fibre' panel that will crack easy.  The true LP siding panels are pre-primed on the outside surface and have a natural osb color on the inside surface.
If you're always in a hurry and terrible with commitments, I might suggest you rent a storage space or continue parking your forty thousand dollar cars in the driveway and save your garage space for unused furniture, bicycles, unpacked boxes, garden rakes, and lawn mowers. Because, the biggest enemy in do-it-yourself is not the lack of carpentry skills or ability to follow directions, but lack of planning and failure to schedule the time it takes to get the job done.
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
The front wall has a 6-foot-long top plate and two 1-foot-long bottom plates, leaving space for a 4-foot-wide door. The four wall studs are 81 1/4 inches long; install them as shown in the front framing detail at left. Next, install the 73-inch-long jack studs, and then attach the 51-inch-long doubled header. Finally, attach the 6 1/4-inch-long cripple studs.
Materials for this door cost about $140. A similar style prehung exterior door can easily cost more than $1,000. Of course, this door isn’t as weather-tight as a prehung door, and it wouldn’t work on your house, but it’s perfect for a shed. You get the look of an expensive custom wood door without the cost, it’s one of those awesome shed ideas that look great.
The next section of the guide that I will take you through is the best ways and designs one may use to build an ideal shed according to one’s desires. We all have different tastes, so it is important to go through some of the designs used so that one may pick the design that suits you better. I will discuss the different best sheds designs and their benefits.
Can you believe that building this cedar shed costs less than $300?! Yes, you read that right – a retail price for something similar can be around $1600, so this is one heck of a good deal. Not only is it incredibly good looking and budget friendly, it’s big enough to store all your outdoor items yet it won’t get in your way thanks to the compact design.
In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.

Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.
It isn’t a requirement that this shed be built against a wall—but the structure is designed to take advantage of the wall for strength. So if you modify it to be a freestanding shed, you’ll need to build a conventional stud wall across the back and face it with the same type of plywood siding used on the rest of the shed. For information on how to mark, cut, and fasten wall studs, see How to Frame an Interior Wall (ignore the part about working with drywall because you’ll be using exterior-rated T1-11 siding instead).

BBB Business Profiles are provided solely to assist you in exercising your own best judgment. BBB asks third parties who publish complaints, reviews and/or responses on this website to affirm that the information provided is accurate. However, BBB does not verify the accuracy of information provided by third parties, and does not guarantee the accuracy of any information in Business Profiles.


I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.
Before you start building your shed, there are a few things you might want to clear out first. For instance, does your town require you to obtain a building permit? Where do you want to build the shed? Is building a shed allowed on your property? Listing down the equipment, furniture, fixtures and goods to be stored in the shed, as this will determine what type of shed you need. What should be the size of the shed? There are practically lots of areas that you need work on before starting with the building phase. The following breakdown will help you get through this phase:
Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.

Any person interested in the field of woodworking will tell you how much time and effort it goes into building a wood project. And even after putting in so much effort, the chances of mistakes and failures are pretty high. So much so, that after a time you will feel like giving up altogether. Most people spend a lot of time and money on their first shed project and often end up frustrated because what they finally create is nothing like they wanted to. Why? The measurements were all screwed up! If that sounds like your story, it is finally going to change.  With Ryan’s collection of shed plans in your arsenal, you will never ever have to look for shed plans anywhere else.

4x8 Shed Plans 4x10 Shed Plans 4x12 Shed Plans 6x6 Shed Plans 6x8 Shed Plans 6x10 Shed Plans 6x12 Shed Plans 8x8 Shed Plans 8x10 Shed Plans 8x12 Shed Plans 8x14 Shed Plans 8x16 Shed Plans 8x20 Shed Plans 10x10 Shed Plans 10x12 Shed Plans 10x14 Shed Plans 10x16 Shed Plans 10x20 Shed Plans 10x24 Shed Plans 12x12 Shed Plans 12x14 Shed Plans 12x16 Shed Plans 12x18 Shed Plans 12x20 Shed Plans 12x24 Shed Plans 14x14 Shed Plans 14x16 Shed Plans 14x20 Shed Plans 14x24 Shed Plans 16x16 Shed Plans 16x20 Shed Plans 16x24 Shed Plans
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Normally we try to help our customers as much as possible, especially if it is a matter of helping to figure out where certain material goes on the building. Keep in mind, you are responsible for correctly constructing the shed if you purchase a kit, but we can offer direction. (Prior construction experience is recommended.) If there is any uncertainty about whether or not you will be able to assemble the storage shed, consider one of our build-on-site options and we will send a team to assemble the building for you.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
×