The Glidetop Slide Lid shed from Suncast features an ultra tough resin construction that makes it one of the most long lasting and easy to maintain sheds on the market. The gliding lid makes walk-in access quite easy, and the reinforced floor makes the shed perfect for tractor support. Perfect for storing all kinds of things, like patio furniture, mowers, bikes, and wheelbarrows. It’s easy to lock the shed and protect everything inside, year-round. The extra secure roof on the Suncast is what makes it really stand apart from its competition. It doesn’t stand too tall, so if you need to keep your shed below fence level then this is the ideal model for you. Suncast is one of the leaders in durable, affordable sheds, and this model is a great choice if you’re looking to save a little money and still have a storage unit that is going to last you for years to come. The assembly of the Suncast is incredibly easy and requires minimal tools to set-up.
This 8×15 shed from Lifetime is entirely constructed in the USA, and comes equipped with two shatter proof windows, shutters, and side entry with 6 skylights for stunning illumination within. The powder coated steal A frame roof trusses and reinforced steel internal wall structure are made of durable polyethylene. The high grade metal screws make it incredibly easy to assemble this shed. Additional airflow is provided by the peak screen vent cap. You also get the added benefit of UV-protection that helps to prevent fading and cracking over time. This storage unit can be used year-round and comes with a fantastic 10 year limited warranty from the manufacturer. The floor of this unit is built so tough that it will never crack, peel, or chip. It’s also slip-resistant and resistant against stains, oils, and solvents. All in all, this is a fantastic shed for those looking for something that is built tough and built to last.

Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
Once you’ve received the package and all it entails, you can begin creating your own outdoor shed whenever you feel ready. The only time you need to exert the effort is when you’ve begun construction. When you do decide to start, make sure that you have a decent amount of time as well as motivation to carry through the whole project. You don’t want to be left with an unfinished shed out in the yard, a constant reminder that you tried and failed.

Ryan’s Shed Plans is going to turn you into the ultimate builder – a builder of sheds, a builder of greenhouses, a builder of tiny homes, and a builder of many things. And nope, no previous experience is needed. This unique online program breaks down the steps to building over 12,000 different types of sheds in such a way that anyone can build the shed of their dreams, sans all the frustration and confusion that often comes with most woodworking projects. It’s like a “Building For Dummies” guide that teaches you the accurate steps needed to build everything from a garden shed to a storage shed, greenhouse, and more. So, if you’re tired of finding building plans that are missing steps, that don’t make sense or worse, that don’t accurately list the measurements or tools needed, you need to give Ryan’s Shed Plans a look.


Complete the siding, then remove the toe-screws and move the wall aside to make room for constructing the opposite wall. Use the same chalk line template and process to build the opposite end wall. Figure C shows framing details for the front wall. Mark the curves on the 2×10 header pieces using the trammel setup shown in Photo 12 and Figure G. Cut them with a jigsaw. When you’re done building the front and back walls, set them aside so you can use the platform to build the roof sections.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.

Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Made from durable blow molded resin, this Alpine shed from Suncast comes complete with 14 windows with delightful contrast trim. The double doors are built with articulating metal hardware so they’re robust and durable. The floor is reinforced for the ultimate sturdy foundation. Extra roof support is provided by the metal trusses and ridge beaming. This shed is perfect when you’re looking for something that is built tough, and stands out beyond the more flimsy and cheap designs that you find on the market. It is large enough to stow everything that you need and keep all items clean, safe, and secure. The outer appearance of this shed makes it perfect for those who want an attractive external design that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb in your yard. All in all, customer reviews across the board are quite positive for this shed, and it makes a great addition to anyone’s home.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
3 The frame of the roof consists of four 2-by-4 rafters cut so that they rest on the front- and rear-wall top plates, as shown in the rafter detail at right. Install a gable stud directly over the center studs on both side walls to fit between the end rafter and the top plate. Install the sub-fascia and then the fascia to the front ends of the rafters.

Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.

A How To Buid A Shed e-Book that comes free with every shed plan order. This e-Book has over 50 pages of illustrations showing each step to building all the roof types shown on our shed building plans, how to frame shed walls, how to frame a shed floor, how to install siding, how to build roof rafters and trusses. It also includes nailing schedules and optional roof details.
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Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
Ryan Henderson is a master woodworker with over 30 years experience and has developed Ryan’s Shed Plans.  This is a detailed digital book with 12,000 shed plans available for instant download with many different bonus offers.  The plans are detailed because they are written by a master woodworker.  He has taught many newbie woodworkers over the past 30 years how to build sheds and other woodworking projects.  He is skilled in the art of woodworking and put together a nice, large set of plans.  The plans are easy to read with step-by-step instructions.
Our backyard storage shed plans are defined by their cost effective quality construction and simple to build designs. Their construction includes 2x4 framed walls, T1-11 grooved plywood siding, asphalt roofing and a strong sandwich construction door. You can buy shed plans with different pitches of roof slopes The lower pitched roof and simple trim make them easy and inexpensive to build. If you are looking for storage shed plans that are designed to be easy to build from and as cost effective as possible, the backyard shed plan line is your best choice.

No shed, regardless of how well it's built, will last long if it's set on a weak base. Most sheds can be supported by an on-grade foundation, which consists of solid concrete blocks or pressure-treated wood timbers set directly on the ground. The concrete blocks or timbers (aka skids) must be leveled and spaced closely enough to properly support the shed's floor frame. Note that it's important to use solid concrete blocks, not hollow wall blocks, which can easily crack.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.

When you nail on the siding, make sure it overhangs the framing on each side by 3-1/2 in. and that you’ve trimmed off the top corner to follow the slope of the angled top plate (Photo 2). Attach the siding with 2-in. galvanized or stainless steel ring-shank siding nails placed 8 in. apart along studs and 6 in. apart along the edges of the sheets. You’ll have to nail blocking between the studs to support the top edge of the siding and the Z-flashing.


Among our builder plans, we have developed a wide range of shed designs, which we offer in form of DIY plans. If you purchase them, you will receive a detailed shed blueprints and building instructions, from the foundations to the roof, with precise measurements in both metric and imperial systems and full list of materials required for the shed. Our garden sheds, storage sheds and gazebo plans are created in a way to make the construction process comprehensive and easy to build for anyone. Especially easy are the lean-to shed plans, narrow but spacious, very practical and possible to attach to any building or wall.
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