The plans are pirated copies, some from "mycabinandsheds.com" as well as scanned 100 year old books . They are basic plans of very limited value. I clicked on a link from a "Kim Komando" email and saw the add for 12000 plans and I figured it was a trusted advertiser. Come to find out after contacting Komando that there are 3rd party advertisers she would take no credit for endorsing. I should have done more research before I paid for anything but after finding out it is a scam I called the 1-800-390-6035 click bank number and they gave me a refund with no arguing at all.
It’s vital to build your shed on a stable, level location—and never in a wet, low-lying area or on a downward slope. And no matter how well a shed is constructed, it won’t hold up on a weak base. A proper foundation is key, one that sets the shed slightly off the ground to aid water drainage and reduce moisture transfer. There are different foundation options, depending on where you live and the size and intended use of the shed, so bone up on the fundamentals and assess your options with this advice from the LP Outdoor Building Solutions team.

Run! Do not walk away from this product! Total scam! The Ryan Shed Plans product promises 12,000 different do it yourself shed building plans. Instead what you get is a whole bunch of disconnected sketches, drawings, And partial blueprints that he has photo copied from hundreds of unrelated sources. I personally have several years of carpentry, homebuilding, and woodworking experience So I assumed that even if these so-called “shed building plans” we’re light on specific details I’d still be able to use them. WRONG! You will find that 99% of the“Plans“ are completely useless for the purpose of building a backyard shed. After an hour of grinding through the files included in that on my download, I did happen upon a singly reasonably complete building plan for a modest shed which included detail dimensions, material list, and the sorts of things needed to actually build a shed. Doing a little more research, I later found where this particular we’ll Drawn to plan had been ripped off from another legitimate Shed building website. Shame on you RyanShedPlans for marketing such a terrible, useless product. Judging from your online sales pitch you are clearly a gifted marketer. If you spent as much time developing a database of legitimate, usable shed plans as you did putting together your totally fraudulent marketing material, you would have an incredible product worth much much more then you’re charging. But I guess you I already know that.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.

Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
The trick for learning how to build a storage shed is to stretch the line across a scrap of wood at each end so there’s a space between the line and the part you’re straightening. On a wall, for example, tack small scraps of 1/2-in. plywood at each end of the top plate and stretch a line very tightly over the plywood. Then use a third scrap as a gauge to check the distance between the line and the lumber. Use braces or whatever is needed to adjust the top plate until the gauge just fits. Now your top plate will be perfectly straight.
Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.
Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
Hello Instructables!  This is my entry into the Shopbot Contest.  This Instructable will show you the steps to building your own shed.   We decided that our shed would be for storage because we wanted to get some stuff out of the garage so we can use it as a shop.  One of the challenges of building a shed in our backyard was that the ground was sloped in the area that we wanted to put it, so we had to find a way to get around that.  Another was that we are building beside some well established trees, and we didn't want to harm their root structure.  This is why we went with cinderblock and mortar rather than poured concrete.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
It isn’t a requirement that this shed be built against a wall—but the structure is designed to take advantage of the wall for strength. So if you modify it to be a freestanding shed, you’ll need to build a conventional stud wall across the back and face it with the same type of plywood siding used on the rest of the shed. For information on how to mark, cut, and fasten wall studs, see How to Frame an Interior Wall (ignore the part about working with drywall because you’ll be using exterior-rated T1-11 siding instead).

It can be easy to get excited and overestimate your DIY abilities when you start a new project. The passion and excitement makes you want to dream big and get creative. But blindly following your imagination can be a step in the wrong direction. If you’re a newbie to DIY woodworking, then you’ll probably want to keep it simple. Otherwise you run the real risk of ending up with a sub par build or even having to rebuild it altogether.
· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
We decided to construct the foundation of our shed out of cinderblocks.  This will help keep out any rodents, and doesn't risk harming the trees beside the shed.  In order to lay a good foundation, we first had to level out the ground. We didn't need to level out the middle of the structure's base because that was later filled with limestone screening.  We made channels for the cinderblocks with spades and a pickaxe, and made sure to create a channel for the electrical as well.  The electricity comes from our house, which is about 10 feet away from where the shed stands.
There are a number of considerations when it comes to choosing an outdoor storage shed for your home. There’s the question of price, design, climate, size, and more. To begin with, realize that you get what you pay for with a storage shed. Saving a few hundred bucks on the cheapest model might not make the most sense in the long-term. This means that you’re passing on quality siding materials like cedar and vinyl. Next, think about how you want the shed to look in your yard. We’ve all seen those classic storage sheds that are designed to have the same aesthetics of your home. For instance, rustic designs for a country-style home. These complementing designs can be quite charming, and allows the shed to stand out as an addition of your home. Another option is to have your shed bleed into the landscape by covering it with plants or by planting perennial beds around the unit.
When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
Build rafters across the roof and separate them with blocking. These should overhang the walls of your shed for increased weather protection. Again, your measurements will be greatly simplified if you space the rafters the same way that you spaced your floor joists. When you’re done, attach pieces of blocking between each pair of rafters along the top plates.[10]
If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
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