Normally we try to help our customers as much as possible, especially if it is a matter of helping to figure out where certain material goes on the building. Keep in mind, you are responsible for correctly constructing the shed if you purchase a kit, but we can offer direction. (Prior construction experience is recommended.) If there is any uncertainty about whether or not you will be able to assemble the storage shed, consider one of our build-on-site options and we will send a team to assemble the building for you.


Step 5 – We bought the shed plans online for a mere $14.99. You can find the plans to build a shed yourself online HERE.  and due to the fact that the back wall of the shed will be up against the fence, we decided to build that first. Of course, we took another trip, yep, you guessed it. Layla was quite excited to get the wood because she has convinced herself that this is a playhouse for herself and her dolls. She expects it to be fully equipped with bunk beds and a place for her dresses. She also doesn’t want daddy to put his dirty tools in her playhouse. I think she and Brian need to work that out amongst themselves. 
Now, let’s talk about small domestics sheds in details and then try to determine if one of the small types is what you need. The least-expensive and simplest sheds are those that anyone can get in a form of a kit. Both DIY plans and sheds kit plans for plastic and wooden sheds are available. Some of the advantages of small storage sheds are they use less land area, are less likely to obstruct the view and they do not clash with the garden landscaping.

For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)


Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.
When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
First, a cute little shed that we found on ladygoats. It’s made of wood, like most sheds, and it has no windows. It’s great for storage but it’s also a nice idea for a workspace. You can turn it into a gardening shed, a place to keep all the tools and to get some things done while working in the garden. We love its simplicity and the fact that it has a playful character and a pretty chic look for a shed. It’s all in the details. In this case, it’s the roof and the hardware that make all the difference.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
Cut the sill piece and assemble the windows with pocket screws. Using a router with a 3/8-in. rabbet bit, rout a 3/8-in.-deep recess on the back of the window to receive the 1/4-in. Plexiglas acrylic sheet (Photo 14). Set the window frame, recessed side down, over a piece of acrylic sheet and trace the shape with a permanent marker. Cut the curve with a fine-tooth jigsaw blade and the straight sections with a fine-tooth blade in a table saw or circular saw.
My Shed Plans is the perfect package for those who do not have an ounce of knowledge regarding shed building. You will benefit from the step-by-step directions, colored illustrations, section details and the woodworking course. All techniques and tricks will be taught to you, so you’ll definitely learn a lot about building your own sheds. If you do have some natural creative ability and some skill, the sheds should turn out fine.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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