For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Wait, I am not over yet. Ryan backs up his collection of shed plans with a very bold money back guarantee. It applies to everyone. You do not have to be an expert woodworker to be able to benefit from this collection. In fact, any person with our without the basic woodworking skills can benefit from it. And in case, you are not satisfied with the material you get in the ‘My Shed Plan’, you can put a claim for a refund and you will get all your money back. No questions asked. You have the time to look at the collection for 60 days and if even after that you are not happy, it won’t cost you a dime.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.
The Glidetop Slide Lid shed from Suncast features an ultra tough resin construction that makes it one of the most long lasting and easy to maintain sheds on the market. The gliding lid makes walk-in access quite easy, and the reinforced floor makes the shed perfect for tractor support. Perfect for storing all kinds of things, like patio furniture, mowers, bikes, and wheelbarrows. It’s easy to lock the shed and protect everything inside, year-round. The extra secure roof on the Suncast is what makes it really stand apart from its competition. It doesn’t stand too tall, so if you need to keep your shed below fence level then this is the ideal model for you. Suncast is one of the leaders in durable, affordable sheds, and this model is a great choice if you’re looking to save a little money and still have a storage unit that is going to last you for years to come. The assembly of the Suncast is incredibly easy and requires minimal tools to set-up.
When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.

If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
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