Now, if the only need for the present is a shed that’s large, consider purchasing garden shed plans blueprints for small sheds at the same time. You might need small storage spaces in the future or there are items that need to be stored separately. For example, for storing dangerous things like pesticides, gasoline and herbicides, the most appropriate sheds are small plastic sheds.
I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.
Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
Building a Shed should be a fun project that provides the satisfaction of creating something and a sense of accomplishment. We have put great effort into our shed plans to make them easy to follow and work from. The How To Build A Shed eBook that is included with every shed plan is designed to show all the different steps involved in building a shed. The materials list is detailed out so that every part of the shed has a label which makes it easier to put each part where it goes. Let us know how your shed building project goes, we love to hear about and see photos of our customers building their sheds! Find the email address at the top of this page to send in your shed building photos.

Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
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I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
Apparently, most guides provide you with the same old information that doesn’t offer any benefits to a gardening or DIY enthusiast. Fortunately, you can benefit from programs like My Shed Plans. This exceptional program is easily available on the internet at an affordable price, and helps you learn everything about building a shed in your garden or backyard.
It’s not always possible, but if you’re using 4 x 8-ft. sheet siding and have enough helpers around to lift the wall when you’re done, you can save time by siding the walls before you raise them. Make sure to straighten the wall plates and square the wall by measuring diagonally before you nail on the siding. This is easier to do on a wood shed floor because you can tack the plates to the floor to hold the wall straight and square while you install the siding.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.

Amazingly, sheds can be used for time spending and relaxation purposes. There has been an increase in the number of people who enjoy building sheds. In various countries as New Zealand, there are even magazines that are produced frequently on sheds where people are educated on shed building, purposes, and many other uses. Furthermore, there is annual shed of the year contest in countries as the United Kingdom where the best shed is identified. In this guide, we will take a look at the different ways in which a shed is built, the different types of shed and their purposes, the advantages and disadvantages, mistakes made in shed construction, different styles used in shed building and the benefits of the e-book that one gains as a beginner in wooden shed construction.


For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.
Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Normally we try to help our customers as much as possible, especially if it is a matter of helping to figure out where certain material goes on the building. Keep in mind, you are responsible for correctly constructing the shed if you purchase a kit, but we can offer direction. (Prior construction experience is recommended.) If there is any uncertainty about whether or not you will be able to assemble the storage shed, consider one of our build-on-site options and we will send a team to assemble the building for you.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
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