Hello Instructables!  This is my entry into the Shopbot Contest.  This Instructable will show you the steps to building your own shed.   We decided that our shed would be for storage because we wanted to get some stuff out of the garage so we can use it as a shop.  One of the challenges of building a shed in our backyard was that the ground was sloped in the area that we wanted to put it, so we had to find a way to get around that.  Another was that we are building beside some well established trees, and we didn't want to harm their root structure.  This is why we went with cinderblock and mortar rather than poured concrete.
Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.
This step by step diy project is about diy 12×16 shed plans. If you are looking for a large storage shed that is both easy to build and that has a really nice appearance, then you should take a look over my plans. This garden project has more parts so take a look over the rest of the sections to learn how to build the roof and the door. Moreover, I have designed shed with many sizes so check them out, as well. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration.

For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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