Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.
Can you believe that building this cedar shed costs less than $300?! Yes, you read that right – a retail price for something similar can be around $1600, so this is one heck of a good deal. Not only is it incredibly good looking and budget friendly, it’s big enough to store all your outdoor items yet it won’t get in your way thanks to the compact design.
My Shed Plans is the perfect package for those who do not have an ounce of knowledge regarding shed building. You will benefit from the step-by-step directions, colored illustrations, section details and the woodworking course. All techniques and tricks will be taught to you, so you’ll definitely learn a lot about building your own sheds. If you do have some natural creative ability and some skill, the sheds should turn out fine.
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]

One last thing about shed sizes, it’s a good idea to always measure out the dimensions in your own garden before you invest any money. You can do this easily by using a couple of stakes and a string to measure out the space. That’s how the pros do it. Make sure that you leave enough room on all sides of the shed to help with rain drainage and prevent water damage.
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
These days, it is not very easy to translate your wooden shed plans into a standard written format without losing any valuable information. In order to learn how to build high quality wooden sheds, it is important to consult an expert. However, consulting an expert may not be viable for every individual. In addition to this, the internet provides you with extensive information about a wide range of subjects.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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