Siding panels made from oriented strand board cost far less than solid wood or plywood panels, and come preprimed, saving you money and labor. Since the panels are also structural, you don’t need an additional layer of sheathing under the siding. You’ll save about $500 over the cost of cedar plywood siding. It’s the perfect material for constructing inexpensive storage sheds.

You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.

For $37, I’d say that My Shed Plans is worth giving a try. There’s nothing more rewarding than having the freedom to pick your own shed design and building it with your own two hands. Taking a different route to building a shed will probably yield less than desirable results, and where would you even start? You could easily rack up $37 in mistakes and wasted time and effort just trying to freestyle it.
When elaborating the shed plans, take into consideration the purpose that the shed will serve. This will help you determine the suitable dimensions as well as the structure of the interior. Keep in mind that you’ll most likely want to have some shelves and a table inside the shed so you need to add these to the list of materials. You also need to take into account the tools you’ll need for the project so you can plan accordingly. You’ll probably need a saw, a drill, a shovel and a few other basic things. As far as the materials go, it all depends on the type of shed you want to build. On instructables you can find detailed instructions and lists which teach you how to built a cute shed just like this one.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
If you plan to paint your shed, natural wood siding isn’t necessary. You can buy sheets of OSB (oriented strand board) siding at a fraction of the cost of real plywood, and it’ll probably last longer too. LP SmartSide panel is one brand. You can buy plain, grooved or stucco-like panels in several thicknesses and sizes. Ask at your local lumberyard to see what’s available.
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.

Galvanized steel stanchions, stainless steel wire, and a hardwood cap were used for the railing of this modern shed built by J. C. Stoneman Construction. Located in Port Townsend, Washington, the modern shed features a sliding glass door, clerestory windows, and a pitched roof that overhangs the porch and provides shade. The siding is made of Western red cedar.


The slanted roof of a modern house in the San Francisco Bay Area is echoed in this small wooden tool shed. Conceived by Astrid Gaiser Garden Design, the shed becomes an interesting part of the landscape design instead of something tucked or hidden in a corner or side yard. Gaiser even added a chalkboard for kids and adults to draw and write messages.
This shed, one of our most popular outdoor storage sheds ever, features some unique details that make it look more expensive than it really was to build. Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows for some cheap outdoor storage. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
This shed featured on houzz is inspiring in many different ways. First, check out the design. Isn’t it charming how all the different types of wood and all the different colors complement each other? What a wonderful way to use reclaimed wood pieces…Another detail that has to do with the design is the fact that this shed has clerestory windows. It’s not usually common for shed to have windows of any kind but, when you think about, it’s a pretty practical feature.

After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
Additional options include ready-built sheds that are shipped completely assembled. Find out if these will need to be finished, sanded, and painted or stained. Prefab and already-built sheds are an attractive concept but investigate shipping costs. Consider feasibility and logistically how you'll manage the project. Some sheds are delivered by a truck equipped with a crane. Will the crane be able to drive on your property and deliver the building without tearing down walls or fences or plowing over a lawn or garden?
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.

Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
×