Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
Complete the siding, then remove the toe-screws and move the wall aside to make room for constructing the opposite wall. Use the same chalk line template and process to build the opposite end wall. Figure C shows framing details for the front wall. Mark the curves on the 2×10 header pieces using the trammel setup shown in Photo 12 and Figure G. Cut them with a jigsaw. When you’re done building the front and back walls, set them aside so you can use the platform to build the roof sections.
They are the simplest and cheapest sheds one may find. They are easily assembled by regular people, they do not require initial construction knowledge. One may find the DIY kits and plans for these type of sheds. The most common type of sheds is plastic and wooden. They are mainly used to store garden tools, tractors and store items that are considered unsafe to be stored indoors such as gasoline and agricultural chemicals.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
We have a large selection of small horse barn plans, tack rooms and run in shed plans. Each of our designs comes with a materials list and construction plans to help you save time and money when you build. We have many different sizes of horse barns including one, two, three and four stalls. Most of the barns and run in sheds are designed to be built with pine board and batten siding on the outside and a 4' tall Oak kick board on the interior.
• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.

The sheds available can be distinguished easily as they come in pale green that eventually fades into silvery grey. The Pressure treated sheds are relatively a bit costlier than the DIP treated sheds and the advantage of using them is that they don’t need further preservative treatment and can serve the whole during the entire ten years saving a lot of time and money.​


Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

×