Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
A shed-like companion residence was built adjacent to the existing house on this property in Austin, Texas. Designed and constructed by Moontower, the structure features exposed plywood, blackened steel, clear sealed cedar, and pine, exposed structural elements, and utilitarian lighting fixtures. A balcony gives the building a treehouse feel and offers views of the Austin skyline and a nearby college bell tower.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
If you buy heavy galvanized hardware designed for farm buildings for your shed, it’s overkill. Buy heavy-duty closet door hardware instead. It’s not really meant for outdoor use, but when it’s protected by an overhang, it holds up well. And if the roller bearings get corroded, it’s simple to replace the entire hanger mechanism. Check out Johnson Hardware’s 111 track and 1025 ball-bearing hangers.

@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are a concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.

I tell most of my subscribers to use his program as a resource just like you would a book.   His plans are not all you would ever need in regards to shed plans, but it is a nice start.   For the cost of the program, it is on par with any book you would buy at the store to find shed ideas or plans.  However, you get thousands of plans and 4 bonus offers instead of a few good plans.
@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
The last project we want to share with you today is a greenhouse/ garden shed which we found on lizmarieblog. It’s really cute and inside you can find shelves, storage compartments and a bunch of other practical things. In addition to all that, this lovely shed even has a chandelier. It’s a decorative element and it really elevates the decor to a whole new level.
Would we do it again? I won’t sugar coat it, this is real life so probably not. Some things aren’t worth the aggravation or the stress. In the end, we didn’t save that much money by building the shed ourselves. I think the total cost was around $1200. But I can tell you one thing, if we are ever attacked by zombies or if there is an Armageddon I am hiding in the shed because the big bad wolf can huff and puff and nothing is taking this structure down. 
Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.

Victoria, Australia-based Archiblox designs and makes sustainable, prefabricated modular residential and commercial projects. This simple, straightforward, and modern structure can be used as a studio, office, guest house, or pretty much whatever you desire. Modules can be grouped together for larger spaces and are designed to subtly echo the geometrical arrangement seen in nature.
Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!
My Shed Plans just might be every do-it-yourself junkie’s dream product. Ryan Henderson, the creator of My Shed Plans, has been building one-of-a-kind outdoor sheds for more than 20 years. If you believe his story, he has unselfishly decided to share his love of woodworking and carpentry through his guides which will enable the everyman who does not have handyman experience to build their very own outdoor shed. Can it be true?
With the wall in position, secure it by screwing down through the bottom 2 x 4 plate and into the floor framing. Frame and erect the rear wall, followed by the front wall. Then, install the interior partition. If you're including a playroom, as we did, cover the partition side that faces that room with plywood, and screw it in place. Then install the final wall.
The men showed up early Tuesday and went right to work.They were polite, friendly and answered any questions I asked. Although my building was on the larger side, 28' by 44' ft. they worked well together and finished in two days! Myself and two contractor friends inspected the building and were all quite pleased with the quality of the building. The men cleaned up the perimeter before leaving and other than a new building you would never know they were there. I am very pleased and would definatly recommend Sheds Unlimited.. 
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.

Think of a shed as a useful multipurpose addition to the backyard. You could use it to store shovels and gardening supplies or all the bbq supplies. It doesn’t need to be big. In fact, a tiny shed like the one featured on ana-white should be enough. Check out the tutorial and the shed plans to find out everything you need to know about this project. If you decide to build your own garden shed, you’ll need the following supplies: 2 sheets of plywood, some wooden boards, hinges, handles, a latch, galvanized nails, roofing, wood glue and materials for the doors.

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