If you are looking for the best collection of outdoor shed plans, then look no further. ‘My Shed Plans’ by Ryan Henderson’ is perhaps among the best collection of shed plans you can find anywhere today. It is a collection of around 12,000 woodworking plans which are designed to cater to the needs of both professional and amateur woodworkers. With over 20 years of experience in shed building, Ryan is an authority in the field. His plans are explained well with step by step instructions. If you follow his shed plans and instructions properly, you will be able to build one with ease. It doesn’t matter if your woodworking skills are basic or if you have failed in making a shed before, by following his shed plans you can undertake any such project with confidence.
Woodworking is an art, and like most art forms, it only require dedication, skill and time. Good thing you have our shed plans. You wouldn’t be spending months figuring out how to cut wood pieces, etc. You will get enough guidance to start right away and build a gorgeous shed for your garden. The benefit? You would learn how to build sheds within days. No experiments and no wasting time!
Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
We’re not going to tell you that all pre-made sheds are bad. On the contrary, if you spend enough money, you can buy a pre-made or so-called ‘flat-pack’ shed and it’ll last you a very long time. However, buying a pre-built shed will cost you double, triple or even quadruple what it would cost you to build your own. DIY sheds are cheaper to build than pre-made sheds, and because you are building them yourself from scratch, you can be sure of the quality. This is a key point, because with a pre-made or flat-pack shed, you can never be sure that the lumber being used is of good quality, or even if it came from sustainable sources (if that’s important to you).You can also put your mark on a shed you build yourself. Feel free to mark the lumbar you use to show off your workmanship, and feel free to modify the design of the shed however you like. You won’t be constrained by building your own shed either, meaning you can add shelves and intricate design features as you go along. Until now, the only option you had was to hire a professional to build your shed since you never had the knowledge to do so. But, today is your lucky day! Welcome to 3DSHEDPLANS™, where we offer gable, lean-to and hip shed plans that come with a complete list of tools, accessories, hardware and material you would require to do the job yourself. And, it’s not that difficult at all! Our plans come with detail instructions, 3D dimensions, list of materials and even highlighted points where you need to nail to attach the lumber. What else would you require to start working on your shed right away?
Wooden sheds have a characteristic look that can mix in well with the environment In spite of the quality of wood, after some time, untreated and ignored wood can decay, split, twist or wind up noticeably powerless to form and mould, so wood sheds ought to be dealt with for insurance with stain and varnish. Wood sheds require regular support. This incorporates keeping plant matter, flotsam and jetsam from heaping up adjacent to the dividers and on the rooftop, and infrequent decay sealing with the additive.
The men showed up early Tuesday and went right to work.They were polite, friendly and answered any questions I asked. Although my building was on the larger side, 28' by 44' ft. they worked well together and finished in two days! Myself and two contractor friends inspected the building and were all quite pleased with the quality of the building. The men cleaned up the perimeter before leaving and other than a new building you would never know they were there. I am very pleased and would definatly recommend Sheds Unlimited.. 
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants. 

For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.

• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.

Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]


Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
Figure A (above) and Figure E show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E).
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
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