Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
First, a cute little shed that we found on ladygoats. It’s made of wood, like most sheds, and it has no windows. It’s great for storage but it’s also a nice idea for a workspace. You can turn it into a gardening shed, a place to keep all the tools and to get some things done while working in the garden. We love its simplicity and the fact that it has a playful character and a pretty chic look for a shed. It’s all in the details. In this case, it’s the roof and the hardware that make all the difference.
Don Vandervort has developed his expertise for more than 30 years, as Building Editor for Sunset Books, Senior Editor at Home Magazine, author of more than 30 home improvement books, and writer of countless magazine articles. He appeared for 3 seasons on HGTV’s “The Fix,” and served as MSN’s home expert for several years. Don founded HomeTips in 1996.
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.

Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.

I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.
Woodworking is a creative pursuit. That’s why it should be fun and enjoyable. If you feel intimidated about taking up woodworking projects, even when you love working with wood, the problem lay not in you but in the woodworking plans you are following. Among all the woodworking projects, people find making outdoor sheds complex and hard to execute. But, that should not be the case. In fact, if the blueprint and the shed plan is good, is explained in detail with step by step instructions, making outdoor sheds should be a breeze.
Because My Shed Plans does not promise anything beyond belief, the product’s foundation is pretty strong. People have enjoyed choosing between the collections of shed layouts and building it themselves. It’s a great activity for the whole family, since it’s all well planned out. It can be a bonding experience, the way a team building exercise at work is.
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]
Ryan’s Shed Plans is going to turn you into the ultimate builder – a builder of sheds, a builder of greenhouses, a builder of tiny homes, and a builder of many things. And nope, no previous experience is needed. This unique online program breaks down the steps to building over 12,000 different types of sheds in such a way that anyone can build the shed of their dreams, sans all the frustration and confusion that often comes with most woodworking projects. It’s like a “Building For Dummies” guide that teaches you the accurate steps needed to build everything from a garden shed to a storage shed, greenhouse, and more. So, if you’re tired of finding building plans that are missing steps, that don’t make sense or worse, that don’t accurately list the measurements or tools needed, you need to give Ryan’s Shed Plans a look.
Edrington used recycled and repurposed materials to build the shed. Restored garage doors were used for the south wall to allow light to filter through, good for seedlings. The floors are made of recycled brick on sand. A pull-down ladder leads to the second floor, where the architect built beds and tables as a cozy sleeping nook for his grandchildren. In the afternoons, Edrington and his wife enjoy a cup of tea in the shed.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
Build the framework for the side walls. The bottom plate of each side wall should be the same length as the distance between the bottom plates of the front and back wall (so that the side walls will fit between them). The standard spacing between vertical wall studs in the US is 16 inches (from center to center, not from edge to edge); since this stud spacing doesn’t perfectly divide into the total length of the side walls in the example design, the two outermost studs make up for this discrepancy by being slightly closer to their neighbors. Most importantly, the top plate is angled so that the roof will be sloped, which makes the height of each vertical stud slightly different. If you’re not sure how to calculate the necessary height of each vertical stud in advance, make the two outermost vertical studs first, lay them the correct distance apart, cut a top plate that spans this distance, and then cut each remaining vertical stud individually based on the distance between the top and bottom plates at that exact location.[8]
• Time underestimation — people normally underestimate the time taken to build any given structure. It is a normal occurrence when building delays, the delays may be caused by issues as inadequate tools and climatic changes that would not allow outdoor activities as the building. Building any kind of structure may take longer than expected. It is therefore important to do things at a fast rate to reduce the number of delays that one has to encounter and also reduce frustration brought about by delays. Completion of construction is also advantageous as one gets to start using the structure sooner than expected which to some extents save on your finances.

The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
Do not make the mistake of not building your own shed because you have never done it before. With the right shed plans you will get the same results the experts get. Begin by choosing plans you feel comfortable with and know you can follow along. Simply follow the steps provided, measure correctly, and in no time you will construct your own shed. Study the building guide to get familiar with all the steps and to get to know the names of all the parts.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
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