Ryan Henderson seems pretty straightforward and confident about his product. There are no outrageous claims that have been made, like building a shed in 15 minutes, and all the expectations on the website are pretty realistic. You won’t feel the need to question the product, as the website is very detailed, making it seem like they only want their consumers to be well-educated on the sheds they decide to make.

A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.
Complete the siding, then remove the toe-screws and move the wall aside to make room for constructing the opposite wall. Use the same chalk line template and process to build the opposite end wall. Figure C shows framing details for the front wall. Mark the curves on the 2×10 header pieces using the trammel setup shown in Photo 12 and Figure G. Cut them with a jigsaw. When you’re done building the front and back walls, set them aside so you can use the platform to build the roof sections.

For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.


Step 4 – Time to finally pour the concrete floor. This requires another trip to Home Depot. The kids are getting tired of this project and at this point, I don’t think they really care about how to build a shed, but would rather take a nap. Layla did kick butt at her morning JuJitsu tournament and won third place for her age group. If you are feeling tired like Layla and overwhelmed you can always get some help with you DIY shed project. Click here for assistance: HELP
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants. 

Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.

Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.
• Use of crooked studs — while building the shed, one would build a shed with crooked studs which may render the shed unstable. It is advisable that as one is building a shed to ensure that all the studs used are straight and uncompromised. That will ensure that the body frame of the shed remains strong enough to hold its own weight and be durable enough for a long time.
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Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain. 
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