• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names. 

Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]

By searching online you can find some free shed plans that are decent. Most often though these plans will be geared towards more experienced builders and they will not be very detailed. If you are a first time builder look for plans you can understand, even if it means paying a little. Use plans that contain a material list and plenty of details if this is your first time. Most free plans available are not as detailed with the building steps, so free is not always a good idea. If you go to the top of this page I have provided a list of some of the best plans from reputable websites.
The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.

We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.


We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.
But I've never drilled a pilot hole in my life, so what do I know. No seriously, unless it's super delicate or thin, I just use the impact driver and make it work. Sure, sometimes the wood splits a bit, but I don't care about looks and most of my projects are built with pallets and discarded stuff anyway. But the thought of predrilling every hole?? And messing a corded driver?? Come on dude, that's laughable!

We make great shed plans.  It’s all we do and we love it! All of our shed plans are available to download instantly at checkout. There isn’t an easier shed plan checkout process on the web!  When you buy a plan from us, you are guaranteed a great plan at a great value.Every one of our 200+ plans are easy to build thanks to our thorough and easy to follow instructions. All of our shed plans come with more information compared to the competition. Things like a tool list, a cut list, and a material list in excel format are all included.


It can be easy to get excited and overestimate your DIY abilities when you start a new project. The passion and excitement makes you want to dream big and get creative. But blindly following your imagination can be a step in the wrong direction. If you’re a newbie to DIY woodworking, then you’ll probably want to keep it simple. Otherwise you run the real risk of ending up with a sub par build or even having to rebuild it altogether.

We have a large selection of small horse barn plans, tack rooms and run in shed plans. Each of our designs comes with a materials list and construction plans to help you save time and money when you build. We have many different sizes of horse barns including one, two, three and four stalls. Most of the barns and run in sheds are designed to be built with pine board and batten siding on the outside and a 4' tall Oak kick board on the interior.
Remember that anything you build will either add or detract from your property's appearance and may impact your property value. Metal and vinyl materials may be easier to maintain, but are the least expensive options and tend to look cheap. Natural wood and prefinished wood products will add character and value, but are typically more expensive to buy and maintain.
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