· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.

Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
Pressure treated sheds, on the other hand, are made out of timber planks that usually have moisture which is sucked out of them using a special cylinder under vacuum conditions. After the moisture is sucked out, a preservative is added to the wood at a relatively high pressure until the preservative is absorbed into the grain, making it an integral part of the wood. This particular type provides around 15-year guarantee as mentioned by the manufacturers even against harsh weather.

Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.

I can’t believe the amount of plans your able to offer for the price. I’m planning on building a summerhouse at the bottom of the garden next month, and I have a rough idea of how I’d like it to look. What I do need is some help with plans and an idea of how much it’s going to cost. Looks like that’s all covered now! With 12000 projects included, I’d put money on it that there’ll be at least one design close to the one in my head. In fact I’m going to. Seams like a sure bet to me. Cheers Jack!
So I recommend paying for the basic package, browsing the terrible selection of blueprints, saving the URL, then demanding a full refund. You'll get all your money back, plus you can keep all the crummy blueprints you purchased. Just make sure you contact ClkBait (or whoever they are) directly, Ryan's shed goons will try to stall your refund if you go through them.

I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.


Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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