The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
There are a lot of plans and designs to choose from when building the shed, so make sure you take a look over several alternatives before starting the actual construction. Invest in weather-resistant lumber (pressure-treated lumber), making sure all the components are in a good condition and perfectly straight. Drill pilot holes before inserting the screws, to prevent the wood from splitting.
Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!
Modern Sheds are defined by their clean and simple looks. They are perfect to be used as a home office, work studio or even a cool place to store things. With lots of windows, a simple low slope metal roof and horizontal siding, these plans are a great way to build a professional work space right in your back yard. Building a home office or work studio in your backyard will eliminate the commute to work and at the same time give you a quiet professional place to work and bring clients.
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Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
They are the simplest and cheapest sheds one may find. They are easily assembled by regular people, they do not require initial construction knowledge. One may find the DIY kits and plans for these type of sheds. The most common type of sheds is plastic and wooden. They are mainly used to store garden tools, tractors and store items that are considered unsafe to be stored indoors such as gasoline and agricultural chemicals.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
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