Build the framework for the back wall. Make the top and bottom beams (a.k.a. the plates) the same length as the length of the floor which they sit. To keep your measurements simple, make the spacing between the vertical studs identical to the spacing between your floor joists. Note that the back wall should be lower than the front wall so that the roof slopes and directs rain away from the door.[6]

Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.


Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.

The Roofs of the sheds usually come in different shapes, sizes, and styles. One impeccable style among then is the Gambrel Roof, highly associated with barns and pole barns. The advantage of adopting this style is that these sheds can be used as high capacity storage spaces because of the steeper sides. Most of the recent homes have Gambler Roof Sheds because of the intricate beauty they bring to the home. Instead of bringing a standard roof, it won’t make much difference to bring a Gambrel Roof, given that you match the materials to your building.​
Ambitious recyclers build sheds from existing materials, like doors, reclaimed lumber, windows, and the ever-popular crates. If you are on a tight budget but really want a shed, research the DIY projects featured on social media, in books, and home and garden websites like The Spruce. Whatever you decide, try to follow through with the project. You don't need the added stress of a half-finished shed every time you walk out your back door.
Compromises are a part of life when you don’t have enough to support your dreams. Ever wanted that Lamborghini but settled for another sedan instead? Luckily, you won’t have to do this with your shed. While a professional woodworker would cost you thousands of dollars to build your dream shed, with us it’s only a few bucks or even free. That’s right! Our free and premium plans are all that you need. We have a wide variety of more than 40 free and premium plans of almost every dimension possible. We guide you on how to build and design the sheds. Whether you are looking for an exquisite addition to your garden or a sturdy shed to keep your tools in, we have them all for you right here!
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!

Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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