A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.


When elaborating the shed plans, take into consideration the purpose that the shed will serve. This will help you determine the suitable dimensions as well as the structure of the interior. Keep in mind that you’ll most likely want to have some shelves and a table inside the shed so you need to add these to the list of materials. You also need to take into account the tools you’ll need for the project so you can plan accordingly. You’ll probably need a saw, a drill, a shovel and a few other basic things. As far as the materials go, it all depends on the type of shed you want to build. On instructables you can find detailed instructions and lists which teach you how to built a cute shed just like this one.

Don’t assume that you’re missing something if you have a question that cannot be answered within the guidelines of the shed plans. Builders at all levels will always have questions and it is better to ask the question than miss something important in the process. Go online and find a forum or a video if you have a question. Better yet, read all the little print that you skipped over in your shed plan and see if the answer is there, it might be.
@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
It can be easy to get excited and overestimate your DIY abilities when you start a new project. The passion and excitement makes you want to dream big and get creative. But blindly following your imagination can be a step in the wrong direction. If you’re a newbie to DIY woodworking, then you’ll probably want to keep it simple. Otherwise you run the real risk of ending up with a sub par build or even having to rebuild it altogether.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
Building a shed is more or less like building a miniature house. It can be a pretty fun project, especially if you have someone who can help. If you’re new at this, we found the perfect tutorial for you. Be sure to check out these shed plans that we found on popularmechanics. The whole process is described in detail, with instructions, lists of supplies needed for each part of the project and useful tips.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.

Now that the floor is completed you can assemble the wall frame on the leveled floor. You can build the wall frames using 2x4 lumbers. The top and bottom 2x4’s are called plates. Place the 2x4 wall studs 16-24 inches apart and nail through the plates and into the wall studs. While the wall frame is still on the ground you can install the siding to make it easier. When the wall is completed rise up and nail it into the floor.


I tell most of my subscribers to use his program as a resource just like you would a book.   His plans are not all you would ever need in regards to shed plans, but it is a nice start.   For the cost of the program, it is on par with any book you would buy at the store to find shed ideas or plans.  However, you get thousands of plans and 4 bonus offers instead of a few good plans.
For those who don’t quite believe in My Shed Plans, they offer a 60 day trial. If within those 60 days, you feel like the product hasn’t lived up to its hype, you may return it and receive a full refund. A decent outdoor shed can be built in a week or two depending on your schedule, and the amount of time you have to build it. Therefore, 60 days is enough for you to test out the product and see what you come up with. If you have a shed worthy of showing off to your buddies, or gal pals, then keep it. If you have a heap of materials in a pile that resembles something Homer Simpson might have created, then return it. No big deal.
Would we do it again? I won’t sugar coat it, this is real life so probably not. Some things aren’t worth the aggravation or the stress. In the end, we didn’t save that much money by building the shed ourselves. I think the total cost was around $1200. But I can tell you one thing, if we are ever attacked by zombies or if there is an Armageddon I am hiding in the shed because the big bad wolf can huff and puff and nothing is taking this structure down. 
Very nice project. Seems to be well built. When I built mine we went with a full basement and made it tall enough for a 4 ft. attic as well. We maximized our footprint in storage capacity. Electricity in the shed was also a must with its own breaker panel. We needed the space because I even have stuff to fix stuff and there is no such thing as a bad piece of junk.
Additional options include ready-built sheds that are shipped completely assembled. Find out if these will need to be finished, sanded, and painted or stained. Prefab and already-built sheds are an attractive concept but investigate shipping costs. Consider feasibility and logistically how you'll manage the project. Some sheds are delivered by a truck equipped with a crane. Will the crane be able to drive on your property and deliver the building without tearing down walls or fences or plowing over a lawn or garden?
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.

Search the hashtag #vintagetrailers on Instagram and you'll discover some 80,000 images of big, small, and mid-sized aluminum travel trailers from roughly the 1950s to 1970s. You might find gleaming silver Airstreams at a lodging rental in Joshua Tree or parked temporarily at a campground near Yellowstone. One trend that hasn't lost steam is the backyard she-shed trailer escape, a dolled-up adult playhouse where women--or men--can escape for alone time or hang out with friends and a bottle or two of wine.  There's even a Vintage Trailer Magazine for enthusiasts. This vintage Aljo trailer rests in the backyard of a house in Pasadena, California.
When you nail on the siding, make sure it overhangs the framing on each side by 3-1/2 in. and that you’ve trimmed off the top corner to follow the slope of the angled top plate (Photo 2). Attach the siding with 2-in. galvanized or stainless steel ring-shank siding nails placed 8 in. apart along studs and 6 in. apart along the edges of the sheets. You’ll have to nail blocking between the studs to support the top edge of the siding and the Z-flashing.
It is worth mentioning that the files in this program can be easily downloaded into PDF format. This provides you with each access at your construction site. The best part is that you can easily browse through different shed plans on your server, and pick the ones that meet your specific project needs and requirements. You can even download everything on your server. The process is very easy to access and understand.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
My Shed Plans provides you with numerous benefits, such as easy to understand language, ease of access, properly organized plans and more. Besides these benefits, the program also contains a wide range of features to make everything easier for you. These features and benefits make this program stand apart from the competition. This is a unique program easily available in the market. The program offers a lot to people who want a shed in their backyard or garden. Here are some key features of the program that make it an exceptional choice :
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
My Shed Plans provides you with numerous benefits, such as easy to understand language, ease of access, properly organized plans and more. Besides these benefits, the program also contains a wide range of features to make everything easier for you. These features and benefits make this program stand apart from the competition. This is a unique program easily available in the market. The program offers a lot to people who want a shed in their backyard or garden. Here are some key features of the program that make it an exceptional choice :
DIY Storage Shed Kits are the same price as a regular shed. We simply partially assemble the shed kit and send it as a package for you to assemble. If you wish to have Sheds Unlimited assemble the shed kit for you there is an extra cost from 25% to 40% depending on the type of storage shed or prefab car garage you wish to purchase. The prefab cost is also added to any options on the building. In addition, there may be extra storage shed kit shipping charges depending on your location.

Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).
Did we forget to mention that when you work on the shed yourself, you have the freedom of using the material you want? For instance, if you buy a shed building kit, you will simply be limited to the material that comes with it. But, when you are building the shed yourself, you have all the freedom in the world to pick and choose whatever you like. However, considering you don’t have much experience with building sheds, how would you know what material is better suited? Well, that’s where our free and premium plan come into play. Our plans come with complete lists of materials, hardware and tools that you would require to build the shed alongside their required quantity. We also suggest any alternate material that you can buy if anything is unavailable. You can add the type of doors you want or the windows while we give you the dimensions and how to work around them. Our plans are simple yet powerful and they help while you build your dream shed.

I got suckered into the 12k shed plans, only to find myself falling for one of the oldest scammer sales pitches in the book by being up-sold into the add-ons. Before I clicked I did a quick review and the first few sites that popped up had said that it was worth the money to buy the add-on because that is where the real value was (perhaps a review page planted by the good folks of MyShedPlans).
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.
Whether you build your own trusses or order them from the lumberyard, building a roof with trusses is much easier than framing a roof one rafter at a time. As a general rule when learning how to build a shed roof, you’ll need one truss every 2 ft. If you build your own, the cost will be about half this amount. Connect the framing for site-built trusses with plywood gussets glued and screwed to the joints.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
×