Now, imagine a price you think you might have to pay for such a comprehensive package – sure you will think not less than a few hundred at least. The good news is that Ryan is offering all of it at an unbelievable price of just $37. I am sure you were quite blown away when you heard about the quantity and quality of the shed plans and the bonuses you would be getting with them. So, doesn’t $37 for so many useful resources on woodworking sounds like a great idea. In my opinion, surely it is. Once, you have this collection in your arsenal, you are never going to run out of ideas. That is assured.
As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.

It is worth mentioning that the files in this program can be easily downloaded into PDF format. This provides you with each access at your construction site. The best part is that you can easily browse through different shed plans on your server, and pick the ones that meet your specific project needs and requirements. You can even download everything on your server. The process is very easy to access and understand.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]

For those who don’t quite believe in My Shed Plans, they offer a 60 day trial. If within those 60 days, you feel like the product hasn’t lived up to its hype, you may return it and receive a full refund. A decent outdoor shed can be built in a week or two depending on your schedule, and the amount of time you have to build it. Therefore, 60 days is enough for you to test out the product and see what you come up with. If you have a shed worthy of showing off to your buddies, or gal pals, then keep it. If you have a heap of materials in a pile that resembles something Homer Simpson might have created, then return it. No big deal.
Does this all sound very promising and great, but you still have your doubts about not being certain how to build a shed and if you are brave enough to buy the shed blueprints? We can help here as well with our newest book How to build a tiny house. This step by step guide with illustration and photographs provides useful information and in-depth instructions regarding every area of timber frame construction and its foundations, walls, roof and floor. You can order it anytime on our website, in a print version or as ebook.
@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!

A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
If you buy heavy galvanized hardware designed for farm buildings for your shed, it’s overkill. Buy heavy-duty closet door hardware instead. It’s not really meant for outdoor use, but when it’s protected by an overhang, it holds up well. And if the roller bearings get corroded, it’s simple to replace the entire hanger mechanism. Check out Johnson Hardware’s 111 track and 1025 ball-bearing hangers.
Would we do it again? I won’t sugar coat it, this is real life so probably not. Some things aren’t worth the aggravation or the stress. In the end, we didn’t save that much money by building the shed ourselves. I think the total cost was around $1200. But I can tell you one thing, if we are ever attacked by zombies or if there is an Armageddon I am hiding in the shed because the big bad wolf can huff and puff and nothing is taking this structure down. 
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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