The Glidetop Slide Lid shed from Suncast features an ultra tough resin construction that makes it one of the most long lasting and easy to maintain sheds on the market. The gliding lid makes walk-in access quite easy, and the reinforced floor makes the shed perfect for tractor support. Perfect for storing all kinds of things, like patio furniture, mowers, bikes, and wheelbarrows. It’s easy to lock the shed and protect everything inside, year-round. The extra secure roof on the Suncast is what makes it really stand apart from its competition. It doesn’t stand too tall, so if you need to keep your shed below fence level then this is the ideal model for you. Suncast is one of the leaders in durable, affordable sheds, and this model is a great choice if you’re looking to save a little money and still have a storage unit that is going to last you for years to come. The assembly of the Suncast is incredibly easy and requires minimal tools to set-up.
The program consists of a wide range of downloadable files, which contain many different step by step instructions and plans related to woodworking. These tutorials are focused on a wide range of projects, such as potting shed plans, wood shed plans, storage shed plans, garage storage plans, house plans and more. All the shed plans discussed in this program are divided on the basis of each project type.
Ryan Henderson seems pretty straightforward and confident about his product. There are no outrageous claims that have been made, like building a shed in 15 minutes, and all the expectations on the website are pretty realistic. You won’t feel the need to question the product, as the website is very detailed, making it seem like they only want their consumers to be well-educated on the sheds they decide to make.
· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
So I recommend paying for the basic package, browsing the terrible selection of blueprints, saving the URL, then demanding a full refund. You'll get all your money back, plus you can keep all the crummy blueprints you purchased. Just make sure you contact ClkBait (or whoever they are) directly, Ryan's shed goons will try to stall your refund if you go through them.
A saltbox shed is defined by its double sloping roof style. The front roof has a steep slope of 12/12, and the rear roof has a lower slope of 5/12. Most plans have options for the doors on either the front or side. Click on the images to view more details. The saltbox style evolved from the practice of extending the second floor roof line down to the first floor level to create additional covered living space. The design adds a south eastern flair to back yard shed designs.
With that kind of quantity, there are indeed a lot of good designs that you can find in this pack. However, the absurd amount of content is abundant for all level of woodworkers. The drawings are exclusively technical with the bonus materials which make the package, a lifetime one. The designs in this package are brainstorming. As an amateur carpenter, I’m starting from a point where I haven’t taught of building design; I came a long way and half of the credit goes to Ryan Shed Plans. The shed plans provided here are very original and indeed are fun to build if you can combine a lot of plans into one.​
When you nail on the siding, make sure it overhangs the framing on each side by 3-1/2 in. and that you’ve trimmed off the top corner to follow the slope of the angled top plate (Photo 2). Attach the siding with 2-in. galvanized or stainless steel ring-shank siding nails placed 8 in. apart along studs and 6 in. apart along the edges of the sheets. You’ll have to nail blocking between the studs to support the top edge of the siding and the Z-flashing.

Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).


· Gable shed — they are also common due to their stylish two-faced roof that meets at the center forming a peak. Their roof shapes are conducive as they provide adequate space, but not as much as the gambrel styled sheds. They provide adequate spaces for storage of garden tools. They also accommodate larger items as motorcycles. The property that makes these sheds become common is their stylish shape that blends in well with any compound with a house of any design.
• Improper geographical placement — this is one of the huge mistakes one may make while shed building. It may be too close to your house hence obstructing your beautiful view from your living room or your kitchen as you are cooking. The last thing one would want is not like your house because of a simple thing as a view, so be careful with where you place your shed. One may also build the shed too far away from their house which again is an inconvenience. Who would want to walk from your house to your shed to get some tool you need and you have to trek some long distance? You may also need your shed someplace you can see due to the security reasons. You would want some stupid thief taking your stuff without you see them, would you? Or walking down a snowy lane during a chilly night just so you could get something from your shed. Before building your shed consider all the factors whether positive or negative and then come up with the place in your compound with the most advantages compared to disadvantages.
Most homeowners barely have enough time to keep their homes in shape, never mind their sheds. Heck, I was supposed to paint our downstairs bathroom before the kids got out of school last month. I just picked up the paint yesterday. That's why it's smart to choose low-maintenance materials for your shed. You usually need to pay a bit extra for these, but they'll save you time and trouble in the long run.

Our backyard storage shed plans are defined by their cost effective quality construction and simple to build designs. Their construction includes 2x4 framed walls, T1-11 grooved plywood siding, asphalt roofing and a strong sandwich construction door. You can buy shed plans with different pitches of roof slopes The lower pitched roof and simple trim make them easy and inexpensive to build. If you are looking for storage shed plans that are designed to be easy to build from and as cost effective as possible, the backyard shed plan line is your best choice.

We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]

We provide outdoor shed plans that are affordable and easy to build from. Our storage shed plans are organized so that you can buy shed plans and build your own shed no matter what your skill level. There are helpful how to build instructions and tips that go along with each stage of the storage building process from the foundation, floor, walls to the roof. Building your own shed saves you money and is a very rewarding experience that adds value to your property. Click the shed images above to view our library of over 200 storage shed plans.


It’s vital to build your shed on a stable, level location—and never in a wet, low-lying area or on a downward slope. And no matter how well a shed is constructed, it won’t hold up on a weak base. A proper foundation is key, one that sets the shed slightly off the ground to aid water drainage and reduce moisture transfer. There are different foundation options, depending on where you live and the size and intended use of the shed, so bone up on the fundamentals and assess your options with this advice from the LP Outdoor Building Solutions team.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
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