Our Free shed plans are aimed more at giving you an idea of what to expect with from the premium plan. For the advanced DIYer, the basic free plans may even be enough to build the full shed. But if you’re a beginner the basic free plan will only act as a guide. In order to get the full step-by-step instructions you would need to invest in one of our premium plans.
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.

If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
So I recommend paying for the basic package, browsing the terrible selection of blueprints, saving the URL, then demanding a full refund. You'll get all your money back, plus you can keep all the crummy blueprints you purchased. Just make sure you contact ClkBait (or whoever they are) directly, Ryan's shed goons will try to stall your refund if you go through them.
High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.
A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.

The walls of the foundation have been created and the electrical is all set, now all that needs to be done is to fill the gaping hole in between them with limestone agrigate.  We also threw in some concrete paving stones that we had lying around because we don't plan on using them and we had already tried to give them away.  After the limestone is in place tamp it down by jumping on it and keep filling up any places that are no longer level.  After the entire base is filled with as much limestone as you can fit put a sprinkler on to soak it and set it for the next hour or so.  You may need to add a bit more limestone after this is done as well.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
We found all the materials to build this shed at our local home center. Most of the construction is straightforward and requires only standard carpentry tools and a circular saw. For how to build the shed windows and door, you’ll also need a table saw, power miter saw and router. We used a Kreg pocket hole jig and pocket hole screws to assemble the door and windows. Another really great thing about small storage sheds such as this on, it don’t take as long to build! With a helper or two, you could have the platform and shell built in two or three days. Then expect to spend four or five more days completing the siding, trim, doors, windows and roofing.
There are many types of roof design that you can use to add to your shed. But since you are a beginner, I would advise you to build a simple roof structure so as to avoid the frustrations that can come with building complex roof structures. Complex roof structures also require additional tools and greats skills hence, it is time consuming and a bit expensive compared to the simple roof structure.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
Nail plywood sheeting to the joists to form the floor. If necessary, use H-clips in addition to nailing the sheets into place; these fit between two pieces of plywood and lock them together for additional structural strength. In the example design, two standard sheets of 4- by 8-foot plywood are used whole and a third is sawn in half and used to fill in the 4-foot difference on either end. Because of the spacing of the piers, support beams, and joists, no additional cuts or adjustments are necessary. Note that the pieces of plywood are intentionally misaligned so that the floor doesn’t have a single seam running across the whole thing, which would be a significant structural weakness.
Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
The roof trusses support the plywood and shingles that make the roof waterproof.  They are very important to plan carefully because they require strange angles and they have to fit the structure below them.  We gave our shed a slight awning and this had to be accompanied by the trusses, which overhang the walls of the shed by about a foot on each side.  When constructing your joists it is important to use joist plates otherwise the angles that you so carefully planned will not remain true for very long.  We used a 2x4 to support the joists while we were attaching them to the walls.
Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
Once you decide that adding a shed will increase the enjoyment of your outdoor space, it’s time to ask pertinent questions to assess your needs. Consider exactly how you want to use your shed, what design will best suit those tasks, and how much your budget will allow. Learn what features are most popular, and why. Also research what’s really involved with building a shed yourself, as opposed to hiring a pro to do the job, and be sure you understand such important factors as warranty and delivery.
Now that the skeleton of your roof is ready, it’s to go pro. You will be adding roof felt and shingles to make your roof robust, resilient and obviously good looking. Metal roof sheets, fiberglass and felt are some of the basic options you have. Feel free to use any material you like for the roofing. However, we recommend using felt since it is easier to work with and install, and is highly weather and water resistant.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.
These days, it is not very easy to translate your wooden shed plans into a standard written format without losing any valuable information. In order to learn how to build high quality wooden sheds, it is important to consult an expert. However, consulting an expert may not be viable for every individual. In addition to this, the internet provides you with extensive information about a wide range of subjects.
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.

Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Proceeding with your shed requires smart planning. For starters, you may need a permit from your local zoning authority and/or homeowners’ association to build a new structure on your property; check with the proper authorities before you even invest in the materials. Plus, there may be rules that dictate how you may use your shed, or whether you’re allowed to wire it for electricity. Once you get the go-ahead to build, you’ll want reliable guidelines. For anyone inclined to DIY rather than buy a prebuilt shed, look over a selection of free LP Outdoor Building Solutions plans based on your choice of size and roof style. Each set of plans comes with extensive material and hardware lists, detailed construction information, and tried-and-true building tips.
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
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