A How To Buid A Shed e-Book that comes free with every shed plan order. This e-Book has over 50 pages of illustrations showing each step to building all the roof types shown on our shed building plans, how to frame shed walls, how to frame a shed floor, how to install siding, how to build roof rafters and trusses. It also includes nailing schedules and optional roof details.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
Compromises are a part of life when you don’t have enough to support your dreams. Ever wanted that Lamborghini but settled for another sedan instead? Luckily, you won’t have to do this with your shed. While a professional woodworker would cost you thousands of dollars to build your dream shed, with us it’s only a few bucks or even free. That’s right! Our free and premium plans are all that you need. We have a wide variety of more than 40 free and premium plans of almost every dimension possible. We guide you on how to build and design the sheds. Whether you are looking for an exquisite addition to your garden or a sturdy shed to keep your tools in, we have them all for you right here!

For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.

How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.
Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
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