Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
We’re not going to tell you that all pre-made sheds are bad. On the contrary, if you spend enough money, you can buy a pre-made or so-called ‘flat-pack’ shed and it’ll last you a very long time. However, buying a pre-built shed will cost you double, triple or even quadruple what it would cost you to build your own. DIY sheds are cheaper to build than pre-made sheds, and because you are building them yourself from scratch, you can be sure of the quality. This is a key point, because with a pre-made or flat-pack shed, you can never be sure that the lumber being used is of good quality, or even if it came from sustainable sources (if that’s important to you).You can also put your mark on a shed you build yourself. Feel free to mark the lumbar you use to show off your workmanship, and feel free to modify the design of the shed however you like. You won’t be constrained by building your own shed either, meaning you can add shelves and intricate design features as you go along. Until now, the only option you had was to hire a professional to build your shed since you never had the knowledge to do so. But, today is your lucky day! Welcome to 3DSHEDPLANS™, where we offer gable, lean-to and hip shed plans that come with a complete list of tools, accessories, hardware and material you would require to do the job yourself. And, it’s not that difficult at all! Our plans come with detail instructions, 3D dimensions, list of materials and even highlighted points where you need to nail to attach the lumber. What else would you require to start working on your shed right away?
After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
Think of a shed as a useful multipurpose addition to the backyard. You could use it to store shovels and gardening supplies or all the bbq supplies. It doesn’t need to be big. In fact, a tiny shed like the one featured on ana-white should be enough. Check out the tutorial and the shed plans to find out everything you need to know about this project. If you decide to build your own garden shed, you’ll need the following supplies: 2 sheets of plywood, some wooden boards, hinges, handles, a latch, galvanized nails, roofing, wood glue and materials for the doors. 

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