The framing is the most important part of the above-ground structure because it stiffens up the plywood boards and supports the roof.  You will need a lot of 2x4's, and a way to attach them.  We used this as an excuse to buy some new air hammers from canadian tire.  We were able to get the lumber for the entire project delivered by a company called Tamrack Lumber.  They brought out a truck and dropped off all the supplies.  For the roofing you will need little plates with groups of nails sticking out of them which I believe are called joist plates.  These are used on the angles to keep them from shifting.  The last thing you will need is a way to cut all of the 2x4's.  To do this we borrowed a very nice miter saw from a friend for a few days.  It is much easier if the cutting tool can cut on angles, otherwise you will be left to improvise when cutting the peices for the roof.

· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.
I tell most of my subscribers to use his program as a resource just like you would a book.   His plans are not all you would ever need in regards to shed plans, but it is a nice start.   For the cost of the program, it is on par with any book you would buy at the store to find shed ideas or plans.  However, you get thousands of plans and 4 bonus offers instead of a few good plans.
Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
The sheds available can be distinguished easily as they come in pale green that eventually fades into silvery grey. The Pressure treated sheds are relatively a bit costlier than the DIP treated sheds and the advantage of using them is that they don’t need further preservative treatment and can serve the whole during the entire ten years saving a lot of time and money.​
Now that the skeleton of your roof is ready, it’s to go pro. You will be adding roof felt and shingles to make your roof robust, resilient and obviously good looking. Metal roof sheets, fiberglass and felt are some of the basic options you have. Feel free to use any material you like for the roofing. However, we recommend using felt since it is easier to work with and install, and is highly weather and water resistant.
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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