A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
• Wastage of space — this is one of the greatest mistakes one can make. It is mostly caused by poor construction planning. You may such a mistake also by taking measurements poorly. You should consider all the activities and purposes that you will use your shed for before starting the construction. In that manner, you will be able to come up with a shed design that will suit its purpose and your wishes. One may also consider building a double floor shed to save on your compound space. You wouldn’t want to deny your kids their playing ground! You may also want to construct a different structure in the future then you get hindered due to the little space left or unless you would have to dig deeper into your pockets to modify your shed.
When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.

Well, if you look at the name of the project, it doesn’t actually appear to be what it says. The title says that Ryan Shed Plans also known as MyShedPlans contains a compendium of 12,000 Blueprints. But if you look at the package carefully, the phrasing on the website contains 12,000 Woodworking Shed Plans and Shed Designs. Most of the blueprints are ShedPlans that cover both small scale and big scale projects, and you can come across thousands and thousands of different blueprints with different architectural, functional and aesthetic features.​


Galvanized steel stanchions, stainless steel wire, and a hardwood cap were used for the railing of this modern shed built by J. C. Stoneman Construction. Located in Port Townsend, Washington, the modern shed features a sliding glass door, clerestory windows, and a pitched roof that overhangs the porch and provides shade. The siding is made of Western red cedar.

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.


A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.

It isn’t a requirement that this shed be built against a wall—but the structure is designed to take advantage of the wall for strength. So if you modify it to be a freestanding shed, you’ll need to build a conventional stud wall across the back and face it with the same type of plywood siding used on the rest of the shed. For information on how to mark, cut, and fasten wall studs, see How to Frame an Interior Wall (ignore the part about working with drywall because you’ll be using exterior-rated T1-11 siding instead).
Among our builder plans, we have developed a wide range of shed designs, which we offer in form of DIY plans. If you purchase them, you will receive a detailed shed blueprints and building instructions, from the foundations to the roof, with precise measurements in both metric and imperial systems and full list of materials required for the shed. Our garden sheds, storage sheds and gazebo plans are created in a way to make the construction process comprehensive and easy to build for anyone. Especially easy are the lean-to shed plans, narrow but spacious, very practical and possible to attach to any building or wall.

The advertising was incredibly misleading. The early indications (at least via ********) are that you can purchase downloadable shed plans. Further claims are made that **** ********* is offering something unique in the detail and instruction, such that someone with no building experience could purchase material, fabricate, and build these sheds. First, that is not at all the case. most of these "plans" are only one-page shots. Second, most of the plans couldn't be build even by someone who is in construction or familiar with building. This stops just short of being a SCAM. At the very least, it's extremely misleading. **** ********* should be ashamed of himself.
Can I tell you a secret? I don’t think I would ever do this again because I have another secret. Shhh, don’t tell, but DIY projects that are a joint effort between my hubby and myself really aren’t fun. They are stressful, and hard and take a toll on us. Which may seem strange in a way because we are both handy and we both enjoy these type of projects and we even have a pretty good idea as to what we are doing. Actually, I think we really have it together – separately! Once you throw the two of us together is gets a little intense. Enough about that, let’s get on to the project.

… Just in case this is NOT enough shed Plans for you, take a look below. There’s a whole lot more! This is just a taste of the staggering amount of shed plans and woodworking projects available. The biggest problem you’ll have with Ryan’s Shed Plans is, you won’t know which storage shed plans to choose from. The choices and different styles of sheds are endless!
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
There are many types of roof design that you can use to add to your shed. But since you are a beginner, I would advise you to build a simple roof structure so as to avoid the frustrations that can come with building complex roof structures. Complex roof structures also require additional tools and greats skills hence, it is time consuming and a bit expensive compared to the simple roof structure.
Our Free shed plans are aimed more at giving you an idea of what to expect with from the premium plan. For the advanced DIYer, the basic free plans may even be enough to build the full shed. But if you’re a beginner the basic free plan will only act as a guide. In order to get the full step-by-step instructions you would need to invest in one of our premium plans.
You will, however, need to follow the approved plans and details without making changes. Also, a basic site plan that shows the outline of your property, house, and proposed shed location will need to be submitted, along with the plans. Be sure to indicate all existing structures (pool, fences, retaining walls, etc.) on the site plan. Forms are usually available for completing the site plans. Two sets of plans are typically required, for the approval process.
Figure A (above) and Figure E show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E).
If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
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