• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
• Failure to account for climate — some people build sheds without considering the weather patterns experienced in the area. The shed ends up being exposed to harsh climatic conditions, continued exposure of the shed to such adverse climatic conditions lead to its destruction. This then leads to one spending much more money to repair the shed. The most common way in which people fail to protect their sheds from is rainwater and snow by failing to have the necessary protecting tools such as gutters and drainage trenches. Gutters are important as they direct rainwater away from the shed hence protecting the shed from getting destructed by rainwater and melting snow that is on the roof. Drainage trenches direct the water that falls directly to the ground away from the shed. These methods keep the wood used to build the sheds dry and hence they do not absorb moisture that may encourage the growth of fungi on the wood. As we have seen earlier, it is also important to coat the wood with protective coats as paint to prevent them from coming into any contact with moisture.
Staining: There are two types of staining. These can either be natural where the stains are purposed to enhance the beauty of the wood or unnatural means which involve activities like painting the wood. In natural means, one has to keep maintaining it frequently as they last for approximately two years while unnatural means last as long as up to eight years without needing any maintenance.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
There are many types of roof design that you can use to add to your shed. But since you are a beginner, I would advise you to build a simple roof structure so as to avoid the frustrations that can come with building complex roof structures. Complex roof structures also require additional tools and greats skills hence, it is time consuming and a bit expensive compared to the simple roof structure.

The roof trusses support the plywood and shingles that make the roof waterproof.  They are very important to plan carefully because they require strange angles and they have to fit the structure below them.  We gave our shed a slight awning and this had to be accompanied by the trusses, which overhang the walls of the shed by about a foot on each side.  When constructing your joists it is important to use joist plates otherwise the angles that you so carefully planned will not remain true for very long.  We used a 2x4 to support the joists while we were attaching them to the walls.
I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.
A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.

Nail plywood sheeting to the joists to form the floor. If necessary, use H-clips in addition to nailing the sheets into place; these fit between two pieces of plywood and lock them together for additional structural strength. In the example design, two standard sheets of 4- by 8-foot plywood are used whole and a third is sawn in half and used to fill in the 4-foot difference on either end. Because of the spacing of the piers, support beams, and joists, no additional cuts or adjustments are necessary. Note that the pieces of plywood are intentionally misaligned so that the floor doesn’t have a single seam running across the whole thing, which would be a significant structural weakness.
My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
· Saltbox sheds — they are a very attractive type of sheds which one would not mind having it anywhere in the compound. Due to its shape, it can be used to store larger amounts of items and can be used in different ways depending on their size as they come in different sizes. They are also used as children playhouses. As in the gable shed, this type of shed has two faces of roofs which meet at the center to form a peak. The only difference between the two sheds is that the saltbox sheds one of the roof sides is significantly shorter than the other.
When people talk about the different types of shed available, what they should describe are the different types of roof available, since sheds only really differ by the type of roof they have. We provide shed plans for three types of roof: Gable, Lean-To and Hip. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-to sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage. Gable, Lean-To and Hip roofs each have their pros and cons. Gable roofs are the most common since they are simple to build and offer plenty of space. Lean-To sheds are popular too for confined spaces. Hip roof sheds are the most complex to build, but they are arguably the most desirable too since they have a more uniform appearance. In terms of shed size, you should choose one that fills the space you have in your yard but you should also consider the overhang for the roof. A 16X24 shed is big enough for vehicle storage and to be used as a workshop, while a 12X16 shed is perfect for storing all your yard tools and mechanical equipment. Sheds smaller than this are fine for basic storage.
The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.
A shed isn’t something you see people build…at least not very often. It’s rather the type of structure you discover in the backyard when you purchase an old house. So how do these things appear? They’re obviously built so let’s see what it takes so put a shed together. We looked around and we found a bunch of shed plans that we’d like to share with you. They’re pretty simple and you don’t need much experience with this sort of projects to be able to pull it off. They’re all customizable so you can enjoy them whether you want a pretty she shed or a manly workshop.

A tool shed is pretty easy to build. We found this inspiring example on thecavenderdiary which, as you can see, has a pretty straight-forward, traditional look. It has its back on the wall and inside there’s not much worth mentioning, except maybe for those practical storage hooks, shelves and rods on the inside of the doors. Check out the plans for this toolshed and find a way to customize them according to your own storage needs.

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These days, it is not very easy to translate your wooden shed plans into a standard written format without losing any valuable information. In order to learn how to build high quality wooden sheds, it is important to consult an expert. However, consulting an expert may not be viable for every individual. In addition to this, the internet provides you with extensive information about a wide range of subjects.

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