I got suckered into the 12k shed plans, only to find myself falling for one of the oldest scammer sales pitches in the book by being up-sold into the add-ons. Before I clicked I did a quick review and the first few sites that popped up had said that it was worth the money to buy the add-on because that is where the real value was (perhaps a review page planted by the good folks of MyShedPlans).
Included with your instant download will be email support from me about any questions you might have on how to build a shed or about the plans or construction methods covered. I am very pleased to offer this service for the low price I charge, but believe it or not, I don't get that many support inquiries and I feel this is because of the comprehensive nature of the plans for all the information needed to successfully build your own shed.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
But I've never drilled a pilot hole in my life, so what do I know. No seriously, unless it's super delicate or thin, I just use the impact driver and make it work. Sure, sometimes the wood splits a bit, but I don't care about looks and most of my projects are built with pallets and discarded stuff anyway. But the thought of predrilling every hole?? And messing a corded driver?? Come on dude, that's laughable!
Sheds are once in a while additionally re-recolored or varnished now and again for stylish and wood assurance reasons. Fire and, in a few areas, termite assault, are likewise potential issues. The damage to wooden sheds can be prevented by applying preservatives when they are exposed to rain, UV light, harsh climate, fungal attacks, insects etc. If you add oil or stain, the wood shed can be made to stand out in the garden given the style it can even blend with the surroundings. Some prominent type of woods like Cedar is resistant to water damage, naturally.
It’s not always possible, but if you’re using 4 x 8-ft. sheet siding and have enough helpers around to lift the wall when you’re done, you can save time by siding the walls before you raise them. Make sure to straighten the wall plates and square the wall by measuring diagonally before you nail on the siding. This is easier to do on a wood shed floor because you can tack the plates to the floor to hold the wall straight and square while you install the siding.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
Wait, I am not over yet. Ryan backs up his collection of shed plans with a very bold money back guarantee. It applies to everyone. You do not have to be an expert woodworker to be able to benefit from this collection. In fact, any person with our without the basic woodworking skills can benefit from it. And in case, you are not satisfied with the material you get in the ‘My Shed Plan’, you can put a claim for a refund and you will get all your money back. No questions asked. You have the time to look at the collection for 60 days and if even after that you are not happy, it won’t cost you a dime.
· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
It can be easy to get excited and overestimate your DIY abilities when you start a new project. The passion and excitement makes you want to dream big and get creative. But blindly following your imagination can be a step in the wrong direction. If you’re a newbie to DIY woodworking, then you’ll probably want to keep it simple. Otherwise you run the real risk of ending up with a sub par build or even having to rebuild it altogether.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!
The DIY shed plans come in various sizes and shapes, few of them even with a little porch. They have a beautiful natural appearance to fit perfectly into your garden or backyard. As are the advantages of all types of small house plans, our outdoor sheds are also designed to be simple, durable, low-cost and to work effectively with a space. If you are creative mind yourself, our plans can serve as a sole inspiration for your own garden sheds designs.
For a freestanding shed, you can build the shed on top of a concrete slab (see Pouring a Concrete Slab) instead of the pressure-treated skids and floor joists; this will actually result in a sturdier—more permanent— structure. Otherwise, for a freestanding shed, the foundation should be constructed on concrete piers or poured footings (see Pouring Concrete Footings & Piers).  Be aware that building on footings will raise the height of the shed up from the ground.
Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.

Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!
Galvanized steel stanchions, stainless steel wire, and a hardwood cap were used for the railing of this modern shed built by J. C. Stoneman Construction. Located in Port Townsend, Washington, the modern shed features a sliding glass door, clerestory windows, and a pitched roof that overhangs the porch and provides shade. The siding is made of Western red cedar.

Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
×