I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.

I don't waste my time on free plans, store-bought sheds, or ready-made, mail order kit solutions... been there, done that. Free means lack of user feedback and you get absolutely no customer support. With store-bought and ready-made mail order sheds: they're flimsy, profit-driven solutions that I've always had to tear apart and modify too much to get the storage space to work or to match the character and style of the home.
This step by step diy project is about 10×20 gable shed plans. This shed has a beautiful designs, so it is not only for storage but also for enhancing the look of your garden. The access is easy due to the double doors on one end, and a simple door on one side. The double doors will let plenty of light inside the shed. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration. Remember that you need to select the site for the shed with attention and that you have to comply with a few legal regulations.
The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
We’ve simplified the door-hanging process by mounting the door to a 1-1/2-in.-thick trim piece and then screwing the trim to the wall. An easy way to mark and cut matching hinge recesses in both the door and the trim is to clamp the trim alongside the door, making sure it extends 1/8 in. beyond the top of the door. Then mark the hinge cutout on both the door and the trim at the same time.
After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.

Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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