My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.
Do not make the mistake of not building your own shed because you have never done it before. With the right shed plans you will get the same results the experts get. Begin by choosing plans you feel comfortable with and know you can follow along. Simply follow the steps provided, measure correctly, and in no time you will construct your own shed. Study the building guide to get familiar with all the steps and to get to know the names of all the parts.
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
For strength, plan to build the front and back layers so the corners overlap each other. Then, to accommodate inset panels, make the front pieces a little wider to create a lip for the panels to rest against. Use plywood or tongue-and-groove boards for the panels, and hold them in with stops nailed on the back. You can assemble the two frames with pocket screws before gluing and screwing them together, but it’s not necessary. After the glue dries, plane or sand the edges to hide the fact that there are two layers.
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A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
Made from durable blow molded resin, this Alpine shed from Suncast comes complete with 14 windows with delightful contrast trim. The double doors are built with articulating metal hardware so they’re robust and durable. The floor is reinforced for the ultimate sturdy foundation. Extra roof support is provided by the metal trusses and ridge beaming. This shed is perfect when you’re looking for something that is built tough, and stands out beyond the more flimsy and cheap designs that you find on the market. It is large enough to stow everything that you need and keep all items clean, safe, and secure. The outer appearance of this shed makes it perfect for those who want an attractive external design that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb in your yard. All in all, customer reviews across the board are quite positive for this shed, and it makes a great addition to anyone’s home.
We now need to create a base that we can nail the frames for the walls into.  We did this with four 2x8's and some bent i-bolts along with a lot of mortar.  The basic process was that we bent the bottoms of the i-bolts after heating them with a blow torch, and then anchored these in some of the holes in the cinderblocks with a lot of mortar.  Then we drilled holes in the 2x8's where the i-bolts were and put these on top and screwed them in.  The frames can now be solidly attached to the base with the framing hammer.
The DIY shed plans come in various sizes and shapes, few of them even with a little porch. They have a beautiful natural appearance to fit perfectly into your garden or backyard. As are the advantages of all types of small house plans, our outdoor sheds are also designed to be simple, durable, low-cost and to work effectively with a space. If you are creative mind yourself, our plans can serve as a sole inspiration for your own garden sheds designs.
Now that the floor is completed you can assemble the wall frame on the leveled floor. You can build the wall frames using 2x4 lumbers. The top and bottom 2x4’s are called plates. Place the 2x4 wall studs 16-24 inches apart and nail through the plates and into the wall studs. While the wall frame is still on the ground you can install the siding to make it easier. When the wall is completed rise up and nail it into the floor.
Here we have officially published over 40 FREE garden & storage shed plans, that are suitable for experienced DIY'er. Whether you are looking for a big or small, modern or classy looking shed - we have all of them available for YOU and that too for FREE! In case you want to GO PREMIUM & SAVE BIG: subscribe to our newsletter now and get instant 30% OFF discount code for purchases in our store.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Once you’ve received the package and all it entails, you can begin creating your own outdoor shed whenever you feel ready. The only time you need to exert the effort is when you’ve begun construction. When you do decide to start, make sure that you have a decent amount of time as well as motivation to carry through the whole project. You don’t want to be left with an unfinished shed out in the yard, a constant reminder that you tried and failed.
This step by step diy woodworking project is about diy shed plans. If you want to learn more about how to build a shed in your backyard, we recommend you to pay attention to the instructions described in the article. Work with attention and invest in high quality materials, as to use the shed for many years in a row. Plan everything from the very beginning, including the building permit that is required in some cases.
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.

3 The frame of the roof consists of four 2-by-4 rafters cut so that they rest on the front- and rear-wall top plates, as shown in the rafter detail at right. Install a gable stud directly over the center studs on both side walls to fit between the end rafter and the top plate. Install the sub-fascia and then the fascia to the front ends of the rafters.


Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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