You will find that the shed blueprints are mostly just that. These are not step-by-step instructional material like you might think. Instead, they are merely design drawings. They include a variety of views, (plan, elevation, perspective), and a description. Sometimes you’ll get a materials list. And while there are admittedly a few that give full instructions, most of them are just shed designs and plans. But because they’re from different sources, some of them are the wrong way round.

Level the ground (if necessary) and install deck piers along a grid to support the shed. The piers will allow you to string support beams beneath the floor of the shed. In the example design, the piers are spaced 6 feet (1.8 m) apart in one direction and 4 feet (1.2 m) apart in the other for a total grid area of 12 x 8 feet. This is convenient because once you lay supports along this grid, it will take exactly three standard 4- by 8-foot plywood sheets to cover it.[1]
• Failure to account for climate — some people build sheds without considering the weather patterns experienced in the area. The shed ends up being exposed to harsh climatic conditions, continued exposure of the shed to such adverse climatic conditions lead to its destruction. This then leads to one spending much more money to repair the shed. The most common way in which people fail to protect their sheds from is rainwater and snow by failing to have the necessary protecting tools such as gutters and drainage trenches. Gutters are important as they direct rainwater away from the shed hence protecting the shed from getting destructed by rainwater and melting snow that is on the roof. Drainage trenches direct the water that falls directly to the ground away from the shed. These methods keep the wood used to build the sheds dry and hence they do not absorb moisture that may encourage the growth of fungi on the wood. As we have seen earlier, it is also important to coat the wood with protective coats as paint to prevent them from coming into any contact with moisture.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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