My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
@diy-plan: Thank-You for your best wishes on the Isacc, believe we always lose sleep when one is on the way. Your advice on not buying factory kit sheds I am 100% in agreement with, they are poor quality lumber, never pressured treated, steldom last more than ten years, here they are lucky to make it six years. I was asked to put one together by a friend after her son bought it for her as a gift, I almost had to rebuild it and when I was finished I thought what an ugly building. Five years later it had termites. When a shed is built on a wood base the base must be anchered into the earth, I have seen sheds flipped upside down after a storm when they are not anchored. I built a shed for a workshop a few years ago to build custom canoes in it, to make it storm ready I used OSB under the siding, then cross braced the studs, insulated it, then covered the studs on the inside with 5/8 inch plywood. The windows have storm shutters that I built for them, if this building fails in a storm I hope I am near the Canadian border.
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5 Popular and Best Paving Materials for Your Driveway Based on your goals and needs, you can take your pick from some of the commonly used driveway landscaping materials listed here: Asphalt Concrete Gravel Pavers Shell A driveway can be a really attractive feature of your home that people encounter first, so be wise to opt for the best paving material for your driveway!
When choosing where to build your shed, choose a flat dry spot on your property. This will make it easier to excavate and level it out, and ensure that you build on a dry surface. Avoid building your shed in a low lying area that is prone to water collection or you’ll find your shed flooded after a big rain. Too much water means rotting wood, blistering paint and rusty hinges and none of that will highlight how hard you worked to build this shed.
The DIY shed plans come in various sizes and shapes, few of them even with a little porch. They have a beautiful natural appearance to fit perfectly into your garden or backyard. As are the advantages of all types of small house plans, our outdoor sheds are also designed to be simple, durable, low-cost and to work effectively with a space. If you are creative mind yourself, our plans can serve as a sole inspiration for your own garden sheds designs.

If you're always in a hurry and terrible with commitments, I might suggest you rent a storage space or continue parking your forty thousand dollar cars in the driveway and save your garage space for unused furniture, bicycles, unpacked boxes, garden rakes, and lawn mowers. Because, the biggest enemy in do-it-yourself is not the lack of carpentry skills or ability to follow directions, but lack of planning and failure to schedule the time it takes to get the job done.
Did we forget to mention that when you work on the shed yourself, you have the freedom of using the material you want? For instance, if you buy a shed building kit, you will simply be limited to the material that comes with it. But, when you are building the shed yourself, you have all the freedom in the world to pick and choose whatever you like. However, considering you don’t have much experience with building sheds, how would you know what material is better suited? Well, that’s where our free and premium plan come into play. Our plans come with complete lists of materials, hardware and tools that you would require to build the shed alongside their required quantity. We also suggest any alternate material that you can buy if anything is unavailable. You can add the type of doors you want or the windows while we give you the dimensions and how to work around them. Our plans are simple yet powerful and they help while you build your dream shed.
How big should a garden shed be so it can be practical without occupying more space than it has to? Well…it depends. I think this cute little garden shed from acultivatednest has one of the smallest possible footprints. The fact that it’s small but tall allows it to be quite practical. It’s great for the storage of garden tools and there’s even some room for a shelf or two or for a few hooks on the walls.
This shed featured on houzz is inspiring in many different ways. First, check out the design. Isn’t it charming how all the different types of wood and all the different colors complement each other? What a wonderful way to use reclaimed wood pieces…Another detail that has to do with the design is the fact that this shed has clerestory windows. It’s not usually common for shed to have windows of any kind but, when you think about, it’s a pretty practical feature.
The roof panels are heavy and a bit awkward, so round up three strong helpers for this part of the job. Move the panels into position and lean them against the front and back walls. Then set up ladders inside the building for two helpers and push one of the panels up to them. Slide the panel up the roof until the bird’s-mouths drop over the top plate of the wall.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
With these basic easy steps, your structure is complete. You may modify the interior of the shed according to how you will be using it. You may modify it by addition of shelves that you can mount on the walls of the structure. The added shelves also increase the storage capacity of your shed. You may also consider adding a lighting system to your shed, it is highly important. In the next phase of the guide, I will take you through the mistakes that are made in shed building so that you are not stranded in the mentioned silly mistakes.
I have spent a truckload of time on the same for five years by purchasing and reading Woodworking books, going through woodworking plan blueprints and understanding woodworking designs. While some of them are very detailed most of them left with questions more than answers because of the incompetency and inadequacy in the design details. I haven’t come across a single plan that had everything I needed, forget the step by step instructions.
No shed, regardless of how well it's built, will last long if it's set on a weak base. Most sheds can be supported by an on-grade foundation, which consists of solid concrete blocks or pressure-treated wood timbers set directly on the ground. The concrete blocks or timbers (aka skids) must be leveled and spaced closely enough to properly support the shed's floor frame. Note that it's important to use solid concrete blocks, not hollow wall blocks, which can easily crack.
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are a concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.
I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
There are over 12,000 different shed plans and woodworking endeavours for you to choose from, so the projects are pretty much endless. You are given everything you could possibly need to build your own beautiful outdoor shed. For those who already have years of woodwork and carpentry experience, My Shed Plans may not offer you enough information that you don’t already know. The only benefits you’ll get from the package are the innovative shed blueprints and designs, which can be help enough.
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