Does this all sound very promising and great, but you still have your doubts about not being certain how to build a shed and if you are brave enough to buy the shed blueprints? We can help here as well with our newest book How to build a tiny house. This step by step guide with illustration and photographs provides useful information and in-depth instructions regarding every area of timber frame construction and its foundations, walls, roof and floor. You can order it anytime on our website, in a print version or as ebook.

I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
Building a shed has lots of advantages which can vary for each person. For example, you could use the shed as a storage space for bicycles in winter. Another option is to use the shed as a storage space for large equipment like the lawnmower or the garden tools. You could also use the shed as a workspace whenever you’re doing DIY projects which is quite funny because the shed itself can be one such project. If you’re the recycling type, you can put a hatch on the side specifically for this purpose and place the bins inside. In any case, a sturdy shed can serve you for many years to come and the shed plans offered on todaysplans show you how to ensure that.
When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.
Build rafters across the roof and separate them with blocking. These should overhang the walls of your shed for increased weather protection. Again, your measurements will be greatly simplified if you space the rafters the same way that you spaced your floor joists. When you’re done, attach pieces of blocking between each pair of rafters along the top plates.[10]

Finding MyShedPlans seemed too good to be true; 12k shed plans, 3-D renderings, detailed material lists, but wait, there's more! Hundreds of useful guides, woodworking books, and project ideas ranging from birdhouses to bridges. And what was more, was the promise of an easy download and immediate access to boundless amounts of material so I could be right on my way to a sharp new shed.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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