Shed are also great if you have a hobby. For example, if you’re passionate about pottery, gardening or even painting, you could use the garden shed as your private workspace. You can give it windows if you think you’ll need natural light inside. In fact, this can be an opportunity to upcycle some old windows and doors. Check out this project that we found on countryliving to see how this chic shed was built.
The roof trusses support the plywood and shingles that make the roof waterproof.  They are very important to plan carefully because they require strange angles and they have to fit the structure below them.  We gave our shed a slight awning and this had to be accompanied by the trusses, which overhang the walls of the shed by about a foot on each side.  When constructing your joists it is important to use joist plates otherwise the angles that you so carefully planned will not remain true for very long.  We used a 2x4 to support the joists while we were attaching them to the walls.
Since the shade is an outdoor structure, it will face various weather elements like sunshine, rain, snow, wind and other factors as insects and moulds. If you are not sure on the wood selection, it would be better to seek advice from a wood expert who will guide you through the best wood you would use to build your shed depending on the climate your region experiences.
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.
A shed-like companion residence was built adjacent to the existing house on this property in Austin, Texas. Designed and constructed by Moontower, the structure features exposed plywood, blackened steel, clear sealed cedar, and pine, exposed structural elements, and utilitarian lighting fixtures. A balcony gives the building a treehouse feel and offers views of the Austin skyline and a nearby college bell tower.
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
These plans are for saltbox roof style sheds.  They are built with trusses that you build.  These sheds are perfect for general storage, garden sheds, tool sheds, potting sheds, playhouses and more.  This shed in my opinion, if you are wanting to build a shed for gardening, this is the one.  It has lots of charm and character with it's desirable design.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
· Gambrel styled shed — it is a very common type of shed. Its roof is highly steep and is four sided. This type of shed at some point resembles a hexagon. This type of shed is preferred as the shape of its roof makes the interior of the shed to be spacious hence creating more space where a lot of garden and outdoor tools can be stored. In this type of shed, one may have a workshop in the shed. They can even accommodate a car due to their large spaces.
With the wall in position, secure it by screwing down through the bottom 2 x 4 plate and into the floor framing. Frame and erect the rear wall, followed by the front wall. Then, install the interior partition. If you're including a playroom, as we did, cover the partition side that faces that room with plywood, and screw it in place. Then install the final wall.

Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!

· Firewood storage sheds — mainly used to store firewood from elements of weather such as rainfall that may destroy them. The most common type of firewood shed is the lean on shed. It is also the most suitable as it allows free circulation of air, therefore, preventing dampness of the firewood. It is also near the house so the firewood is stored near your house and may access anytime you need them.


Because most DIY manuals and plans are written by ghostwriters who don’t know anything about carpentry, it is common to find incomplete guides. This package is different. Ryan has spent time and effort ensuring that his expertise is laid out in a way that anyone can follow. After all, he is an educator. You also save because the plans make sure you don’t waste material.
Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).
My Shed Plans is the perfect package for those who do not have an ounce of knowledge regarding shed building. You will benefit from the step-by-step directions, colored illustrations, section details and the woodworking course. All techniques and tricks will be taught to you, so you’ll definitely learn a lot about building your own sheds. If you do have some natural creative ability and some skill, the sheds should turn out fine.
I can’t believe the amount of plans your able to offer for the price. I’m planning on building a summerhouse at the bottom of the garden next month, and I have a rough idea of how I’d like it to look. What I do need is some help with plans and an idea of how much it’s going to cost. Looks like that’s all covered now! With 12000 projects included, I’d put money on it that there’ll be at least one design close to the one in my head. In fact I’m going to. Seams like a sure bet to me. Cheers Jack!

• The ceiling is too low — these may tend to be one of the least concentrated on problems as they happen least when one expects. It is important to be aware of the low ceiling so as to save on your funds in putting a higher one. Ensure that each and every measurement is taken carefully and is also executed. The best way to determine the height of your shed is by scanning through the items you are planning to store there and use the tallest. As mentioned earlier, the installation of steep roofs might be risky but in the long run become an added advantage as they create more space inside the shed.


A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
Thanks for sharing such detailed plans Seamster. I'm hoping to build a very small lean-to tool shed (2.5X4.5' base) for my very small yard and this has given me a lot of insight. Currently, theor the table and mitre saws I inherited are stored in our spare bedroom... eventual nursery room. I want to get them into their own space outdoors sooner than later. Here in North Carolina with the humid summers I think it would be best to add some housewrap to the walls to help protect the tools. I also have a situation where the back wall will only be 4-6" off the house so need to construct/panel my walls before erecting them. Do you know if it's reasonable to panel then wrap each wall frame, side it and then finally erect and fasten? Would be very grateful for your thoughts!
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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