Garden Sheds are the most common type of sheds that you find in every backyard. Right from the typical Colorbond Shed to the charming mini building adjoined shed that is made of both timber and steel, they bring beauty to the build. Garden Buildings are basically must because most of the houses tend to be beautiful with these. They are incredibly beautiful, authentic and useful for everyone for some or other purpose. Therefore, the Ryan Shed Plans contain some of the very feasible Garden Shed plans from which you can pick a design that seems suitable to you.

After the concrete is all ready, the sole plates are then joined together with the anchor plates which protrude out of the foundation. Use the carpenter’s pencil and measuring tape to mark about one and a half inches from the board end continually every sixteen inches till the further end. These marks guide where the studs will be placed. Mark where the anchor and the mudsill meet up with a different marker from the one used initially. The studs are then taken and galvanized nails are driven through the marked areas into the center of the board until they reach the stud bottom. The studs should be secured to the baseboard.


Because My Shed Plans does not promise anything beyond belief, the product’s foundation is pretty strong. People have enjoyed choosing between the collections of shed layouts and building it themselves. It’s a great activity for the whole family, since it’s all well planned out. It can be a bonding experience, the way a team building exercise at work is.
We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.

We decided to construct the foundation of our shed out of cinderblocks.  This will help keep out any rodents, and doesn't risk harming the trees beside the shed.  In order to lay a good foundation, we first had to level out the ground. We didn't need to level out the middle of the structure's base because that was later filled with limestone screening.  We made channels for the cinderblocks with spades and a pickaxe, and made sure to create a channel for the electrical as well.  The electricity comes from our house, which is about 10 feet away from where the shed stands.


Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!

In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.

The front wall has a 6-foot-long top plate and two 1-foot-long bottom plates, leaving space for a 4-foot-wide door. The four wall studs are 81 1/4 inches long; install them as shown in the front framing detail at left. Next, install the 73-inch-long jack studs, and then attach the 51-inch-long doubled header. Finally, attach the 6 1/4-inch-long cripple studs.

Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
I got suckered into the 12k shed plans, only to find myself falling for one of the oldest scammer sales pitches in the book by being up-sold into the add-ons. Before I clicked I did a quick review and the first few sites that popped up had said that it was worth the money to buy the add-on because that is where the real value was (perhaps a review page planted by the good folks of MyShedPlans).
A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
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