A shed-like companion residence was built adjacent to the existing house on this property in Austin, Texas. Designed and constructed by Moontower, the structure features exposed plywood, blackened steel, clear sealed cedar, and pine, exposed structural elements, and utilitarian lighting fixtures. A balcony gives the building a treehouse feel and offers views of the Austin skyline and a nearby college bell tower.
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.


Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).

Compromises are a part of life when you don’t have enough to support your dreams. Ever wanted that Lamborghini but settled for another sedan instead? Luckily, you won’t have to do this with your shed. While a professional woodworker would cost you thousands of dollars to build your dream shed, with us it’s only a few bucks or even free. That’s right! Our free and premium plans are all that you need. We have a wide variety of more than 40 free and premium plans of almost every dimension possible. We guide you on how to build and design the sheds. Whether you are looking for an exquisite addition to your garden or a sturdy shed to keep your tools in, we have them all for you right here!


We decided to construct the foundation of our shed out of cinderblocks.  This will help keep out any rodents, and doesn't risk harming the trees beside the shed.  In order to lay a good foundation, we first had to level out the ground. We didn't need to level out the middle of the structure's base because that was later filled with limestone screening.  We made channels for the cinderblocks with spades and a pickaxe, and made sure to create a channel for the electrical as well.  The electricity comes from our house, which is about 10 feet away from where the shed stands.
A few decorative touches can help your shed fit in with the architecture of your home and even convey how you use it. Some folks like to dress things up with a front porch, dormer, or gable, but simply adding barn-style doors, shuttered windows, and a bit of gingerbread trim can make all the difference. Color, of course, goes a long way too. Check out all the options at the LP Shed Gallery, where you’ll also see details on the materials used. Inspired by the seemingly endless possibilities, you’ll emerge motivated to create a shed you’ll be proud to show off!
Galvanized steel stanchions, stainless steel wire, and a hardwood cap were used for the railing of this modern shed built by J. C. Stoneman Construction. Located in Port Townsend, Washington, the modern shed features a sliding glass door, clerestory windows, and a pitched roof that overhangs the porch and provides shade. The siding is made of Western red cedar.
For those who don’t quite believe in My Shed Plans, they offer a 60 day trial. If within those 60 days, you feel like the product hasn’t lived up to its hype, you may return it and receive a full refund. A decent outdoor shed can be built in a week or two depending on your schedule, and the amount of time you have to build it. Therefore, 60 days is enough for you to test out the product and see what you come up with. If you have a shed worthy of showing off to your buddies, or gal pals, then keep it. If you have a heap of materials in a pile that resembles something Homer Simpson might have created, then return it. No big deal.
I did my wall studs and roof rafters at 24″ on center, so I used 2 x 6’s for the roof. Also, I made loft storage in the rafters of the front and back 5′ or so and left the middle 6′ or so open for access to the lofts and better lighting. I left the lower cords out in the middle trusses and reinforced them with hurricane ties and extra blocking. To better support the front and back loft floors I doubled up the lower cords on the front and back truss and on the two on either side of the opening and then floored the lofts with 2/4″ plywood. I also put four 14″ x 14″ plastic skylights in tht roof over the center open area to let additional light in.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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