The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.
The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
It's a work in progress and likely a labor of love for Rob, aka Weekend Shed Head, who chronicles the construction of his backyard man cave in Nottingham, England, on his Instagram account and YouTube channel. An experienced and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfer, he sort of makes things up as he goes along and seems to know what he's doing. Along the way, Rob posts photos of train stations, the curry dinners and full English breakfasts he cooks, and charming flowers and decor in the garden.
To be sure, the whole permitting process can be a bit intimidating. And, if I'm being honest here, I've never been comfortable dealing with the city and all their codes - seems they're always moving the line on me. But, I always make it a point to be friendly with the Building Inspector. He's there to help and can be a fountain of information, when building your wood shed.

Our free shed plans offer a solid introduction to shed construction and building technique, and they include a full materials list to help get you started. The instructions provided are basic, but if you have existing experience with construction, then they may well suffice to help you build your shed without having to spend money. Our premium shed plans are on another level, however. They include detailed, step-by-step instructions and they walk you through the entire shed building process. We also include professional-grade tips on select pages to help you as best we can – it’s like having an expert right next to you every step of the way. All the techniques you will learn from reading our premium shed plans are transferrable too, and they can help even the most seasoned builders perfect their skills. Therefore, we recommend premium shed plans to anybody who is serious about building their own shed, with our free shed plans best-suited as a taster for those interested. Hopefully, you’ve now understood that here at 3DSHEDPLANS™ we do not promote or employ any marketing gimmicks. Download our FREE shed plans and see it for yourself. Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE to our newsletter to get special deals, offers and discounts!
There are a lot of plans and designs to choose from when building the shed, so make sure you take a look over several alternatives before starting the actual construction. Invest in weather-resistant lumber (pressure-treated lumber), making sure all the components are in a good condition and perfectly straight. Drill pilot holes before inserting the screws, to prevent the wood from splitting.
If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Pressure treated sheds, on the other hand, are made out of timber planks that usually have moisture which is sucked out of them using a special cylinder under vacuum conditions. After the moisture is sucked out, a preservative is added to the wood at a relatively high pressure until the preservative is absorbed into the grain, making it an integral part of the wood. This particular type provides around 15-year guarantee as mentioned by the manufacturers even against harsh weather.

Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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