Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).
Ryan’s Shed Plans is going to turn you into the ultimate builder – a builder of sheds, a builder of greenhouses, a builder of tiny homes, and a builder of many things. And nope, no previous experience is needed. This unique online program breaks down the steps to building over 12,000 different types of sheds in such a way that anyone can build the shed of their dreams, sans all the frustration and confusion that often comes with most woodworking projects. It’s like a “Building For Dummies” guide that teaches you the accurate steps needed to build everything from a garden shed to a storage shed, greenhouse, and more. So, if you’re tired of finding building plans that are missing steps, that don’t make sense or worse, that don’t accurately list the measurements or tools needed, you need to give Ryan’s Shed Plans a look.

To be honest, I almost named this project “How to Build a Shed from Scratch with your Spouse and Not Bury them Under the Concrete.” Working together as a team in life is one thing, but working together on a home DIY project is another. It’s like being on a drunken see-saw with “stay out here and work with me, but don’t get in my way.” Or, “keep me company, but don’t talk to me” How about, “just play with the kids while I work but keep them away from what I’m working on” Or even “Get me this tool, get me that tool, where are my tools? Don’t touch the tools” As it turns out that title is just a bit too wordy anyway, so I had to shorten it up a bit.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.
The framing is the most important part of the above-ground structure because it stiffens up the plywood boards and supports the roof.  You will need a lot of 2x4's, and a way to attach them.  We used this as an excuse to buy some new air hammers from canadian tire.  We were able to get the lumber for the entire project delivered by a company called Tamrack Lumber.  They brought out a truck and dropped off all the supplies.  For the roofing you will need little plates with groups of nails sticking out of them which I believe are called joist plates.  These are used on the angles to keep them from shifting.  The last thing you will need is a way to cut all of the 2x4's.  To do this we borrowed a very nice miter saw from a friend for a few days.  It is much easier if the cutting tool can cut on angles, otherwise you will be left to improvise when cutting the peices for the roof.

… Just in case this is NOT enough shed Plans for you, take a look below. There’s a whole lot more! This is just a taste of the staggering amount of shed plans and woodworking projects available. The biggest problem you’ll have with Ryan’s Shed Plans is, you won’t know which storage shed plans to choose from. The choices and different styles of sheds are endless!


· Wood sheds — these types of sheds are made of wood. They are the most common type of shed compared to metal and plastics. They are the most conducive as they can be used as children playhouses, outdoor office and still storage of garden tools. They are also easy to modify and renovate as increasing their size. They are preferred to other types as they blend well with the environment and give the environment a good natural look. However, they must be maintained regularly from insects as termites which feed on wood.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.

My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is not just your run-of-the-mill collection of a few hundred shed plans, but it is a collection of whopping 12,000 shed plans. Yes! You heard it right. And each one of them is accompanied with detailed, step by step instructions and diagrams, tool and material list ensuring that nothing goes wrong when you start with one.
Lastly, as I conclude this guide, I would recommend you to sign up for the ultimate e-book on shed building plans. It has been very useful book for me. Initially, I found shed building quite a hard task that one could only hire people to do it for you, but ever since I read it has changed my perspective on things concerning shed building. The e-book makes shed building look as easy as it can get. The e-book gives quite clear guides that are easy to understand. It gives the various shed building plans which are well elaborated and precise. I have also learned the difference and the best ways you may use to build great sheds that meet your needs. If you would like to gain a vast knowledge of shed building, do not miss this golden opportunity by signing up for the e-book!

Build rafters across the roof and separate them with blocking. These should overhang the walls of your shed for increased weather protection. Again, your measurements will be greatly simplified if you space the rafters the same way that you spaced your floor joists. When you’re done, attach pieces of blocking between each pair of rafters along the top plates.[10]
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

×