I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
For the masonry of the foundation we went out and bought 15 cinderblocks, and suplemented these with clay bricks that we got for free off of kijiji and some concrete pavestones from a neighbor's old patio.  Clay bricks can only be used above ground, other wise they will erode.  Looking back, it would have been easier to simply use cinderblocks and we strongly recommend it if you don't have other materials to get rid of.  Also, buy more mortar than you think you will need.  We ended up using a lot of mortar and if you have any extra you can always return it or pour it in the cinderblocks like we did to make the foundation even stronger.
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A lean to shed is the perfect way to build up against a fence or wall and still have plenty of room in your yard. It also keeps water away from the structure you are building up against. The lean to shed design is the simplest design of shed to build because of its single plane sloping roof which makes the roof easy to build. We have many different configurations and sizes either with double or single doors. The larger lean to designs include optional plans to build the doors on any side of the shed. Our smaller lean to style sheds have a 4 in 12 pitch roof and our larger designs have a 2 in 12 pitch roof to keep the overall shed height lower and help reduce shed construction costs.
Once redirected to the webpage, I found a bewildering list of links, and downloads. Some were redundant, some didn't work. And I kept trying to figure out where the 12k plans were. I thought for what I paid I should be able to plug in my parameters into a query and get something that remotely looked like an organized list of plans that matched my query. But nada. Nothing. Zilch. Just piles of pdf's tucked seemingly haphazardly into folders here and there, listed in not too logical order in links on a webpage.
Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).
I have spent a truckload of time on the same for five years by purchasing and reading Woodworking books, going through woodworking plan blueprints and understanding woodworking designs. While some of them are very detailed most of them left with questions more than answers because of the incompetency and inadequacy in the design details. I haven’t come across a single plan that had everything I needed, forget the step by step instructions.
Once you’ve figured out what you need the shed for, it’s easy to go forward with planning. Keep in mind that sheds, no matter how small in their size, are not exactly the best projects for beginner woodworkers. Sheds are one of the most complex woodworking items to build. Some bigger sheds resemble houses so it’s not a surprise a shed is a project for a skillful hand.
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