Now we can actually start building!  Before you start putting down cinderblocks, lay limestone screening down in all of the channels and run and burry your electrical.  Make sure that your electrical wires are clearly marked (we used caution tape) so that nobody digs them up accidentally in the future.  Once your all set, you can start putting down some cinderblocks.  You may need to break some cinderblocks in half, and this is easily done with a chisel, a hammer, and a bit of time.  Tip:  Set Rebar posts in each corner and tie strings across to help you keep the walls straight.  You need to check every single block for level, especially on this layer as the base of the foundation will affect the rest of the foundation and in turn affect the main structure.
Don’t be tempted to get sloppy when you square up the floor and walls of your shed. An out-of-square start will haunt you through the rest of the project, from doors and windows to trim and roofing. For a concrete slab, measure diagonally across the opposite corners of the form boards. Then adjust the forms until the diagonal measurements are equal. Do the same for a wood platform floor. If you’re installing sheet siding on the walls, before you stand them up, measure diagonally and square up the wall before you nail on the siding.

Ø Large sheds — they are larger in size compared to the other type of sheds we have mentioned above. They have enough space that one can accommodate outdoor tools and still carry out activities. They can be used as offices. However, if used as an office, one will have to be careful while carrying out their activities to avoid substances that may hurt or prick them as they are moving around.

Think of a shed as a useful multipurpose addition to the backyard. You could use it to store shovels and gardening supplies or all the bbq supplies. It doesn’t need to be big. In fact, a tiny shed like the one featured on ana-white should be enough. Check out the tutorial and the shed plans to find out everything you need to know about this project. If you decide to build your own garden shed, you’ll need the following supplies: 2 sheets of plywood, some wooden boards, hinges, handles, a latch, galvanized nails, roofing, wood glue and materials for the doors.
You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
Figure A (above) and Figure E show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E).

A backyard shed frees up your home and garage by storing cumbersome essentials like your riding mower, hedge trimmers, and other lawn care equipment. But these sturdy little buildings can serve a host of other practical functions—and hobbies too. Think chicken coop, greenhouse, screening room—the list is limitless! For a shed to live up to its potential, however, it’s crucial to avoid common building mistakes. The dos and don’ts listed here, courtesy of the LP® Outdoor Building Solutions® pros, will help ensure that your shed meets your needs for years to come, whether you’re simply using it for storage or tricking it out as your outdoor fun zone.
If you're always in a hurry and terrible with commitments, I might suggest you rent a storage space or continue parking your forty thousand dollar cars in the driveway and save your garage space for unused furniture, bicycles, unpacked boxes, garden rakes, and lawn mowers. Because, the biggest enemy in do-it-yourself is not the lack of carpentry skills or ability to follow directions, but lack of planning and failure to schedule the time it takes to get the job done.
Galvanized steel stanchions, stainless steel wire, and a hardwood cap were used for the railing of this modern shed built by J. C. Stoneman Construction. Located in Port Townsend, Washington, the modern shed features a sliding glass door, clerestory windows, and a pitched roof that overhangs the porch and provides shade. The siding is made of Western red cedar.
Building something yourself, especially something as big as a shed, is always rewarding, but not only will it feel good to have a self-made beauty in your backyard, it’s times lower in cost than buying a shed. In fact, building a small shed can cost as little as $100! That’s a pennysaver! And well, all proper DIY wood projects should be, ain’t that right?
• Spending too much money on unnecessarily expensive sheds — sheds the main purpose is to house outdoor and garden tools that cannot be stored in the house. Some people spend a lot of their money on large and stylish sheds which to my opinion in unnecessary. Spend your money wisely. You can save a lot of money on shed building by avoiding to hiring a huge manpower in the construction. You may even save some of your money by enquiring price rates of the items you need at various lumberyards, you will be able to know who have the best quality products at affordable prices.
· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
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