Now you have finished your shed!  Once your doors are on, you can add latches and locks.  The windows on our shed are made of 1/4 inch thick plexiglass held in with white silicone to match the trim.  The floor was finished with concrete tiles. You can now choose to leave the inside of your shed barren, to say, store a few larger items, or you can add shelves like we did.  We added the shelves because we had a lot of small boxes and things that we wanted to move out of the garage.  They are made from 7/16 inch thick oriented strand board and 2x2s.  The shelves in the middle have some spare 6x6 chunks keeping them up, which is suitable because they are the deepest and are designed to hold the heaviest items.  They are so strong that you can climb on them, even jump on them!  We also added a bike rack on the right hand side that can hold our five bikes.  The finishing touch on the shed was to add an electrical outlet and a flourescent lighting fixture with a switch.  There is a vent in the back wall for warm summer days but it is probably unneccesary.  Hopefully you can build your own storage shed and de-cluterize your life as well.  Thanks!
I felt that this is a very poorly setup web site. I purchased the Ryan’s shed plans online, did not receive an emailed receipt or link to the web site that worked. Phoned Clikbank and they promised to send another receipt. They did not. I had saved the original online confirmation with the links to the site. When I clicked on these it said the files couldn’t be found.

• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
It isn’t a requirement that this shed be built against a wall—but the structure is designed to take advantage of the wall for strength. So if you modify it to be a freestanding shed, you’ll need to build a conventional stud wall across the back and face it with the same type of plywood siding used on the rest of the shed. For information on how to mark, cut, and fasten wall studs, see How to Frame an Interior Wall (ignore the part about working with drywall because you’ll be using exterior-rated T1-11 siding instead).
Assemble the four wall structures. Wall structures are usually nailed to the underlying support from the bottom up. However, if this is not possible with the design you’ve chosen, simply nail them downwards through the plywood and joists or toenail them into place by driving the nails downwards and at an angle. Note that you will probably need other people to help you hold the wall structures up until they can be attached to one another.[9]
Do not make the mistake of not building your own shed because you have never done it before. With the right shed plans you will get the same results the experts get. Begin by choosing plans you feel comfortable with and know you can follow along. Simply follow the steps provided, measure correctly, and in no time you will construct your own shed. Study the building guide to get familiar with all the steps and to get to know the names of all the parts.

Hello Instructables!  This is my entry into the Shopbot Contest.  This Instructable will show you the steps to building your own shed.   We decided that our shed would be for storage because we wanted to get some stuff out of the garage so we can use it as a shop.  One of the challenges of building a shed in our backyard was that the ground was sloped in the area that we wanted to put it, so we had to find a way to get around that.  Another was that we are building beside some well established trees, and we didn't want to harm their root structure.  This is why we went with cinderblock and mortar rather than poured concrete.
Working from ladders is more dangerous than working from scaffolding. Plus, having to constantly move ladders around is time consuming. When you get to the roof construction, consider renting a set of scaffolding with wheels. You’ll be amazed at how much easier it is to have a stable platform to work from and to set your tools and materials on. You can rent a 5-ft.-tall section of scaffold with three planks and wheels for about $110 per week.

DIY Shed Plans

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