Listen, about the My Shed Plans Scam… all you can say is haters are gonna hate. There are way too many people on the web going about trying to ruin things for others. It probably makes them feel bigger than the basement of their parents’ house allows. In regards to your My Shed Plans product, it looks like a great deal. 12,000 shed plans, all in one package? Seriously, is there any plan that’s missing?
Siding panels made from oriented strand board cost far less than solid wood or plywood panels, and come preprimed, saving you money and labor. Since the panels are also structural, you don’t need an additional layer of sheathing under the siding. You’ll save about $500 over the cost of cedar plywood siding. It’s the perfect material for constructing inexpensive storage sheds.
Included with your instant download will be email support from me about any questions you might have on how to build a shed or about the plans or construction methods covered. I am very pleased to offer this service for the low price I charge, but believe it or not, I don't get that many support inquiries and I feel this is because of the comprehensive nature of the plans for all the information needed to successfully build your own shed.
Build your own shed and you'll instantly have increased space for your tools, a place to work on DIY projects and a way to keep your garage free of clutter. There are many shed plans online that show you how to build your own shed from scratch using wood. It may be easier, however, to use a kit to create a resin, metal or plastic shed instead. A storage shed kit contains all the materials you need including trim. This Home Depot project uses the Keter Stronghold Resin Shed Kit to show you how to build a shed from a kit. We also offer a large variety of other types of shed designs to choose from. Like most, this DIY shed requires tools like a power drill and step ladder to put it together, but assembly instructions will vary by kit. Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully.
· Tool storage shed — they are used to store the tools that a homeowner may need to maintain their home compounds. They may be installed with ramps at their entrance to make it easier for storage of heavy items. They are also conducive for storage of bicycles and yard tools. Your compound, therefore, looks neat as the untidy yard tools are kept indoors.

I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.

Ø Large sheds — they are larger in size compared to the other type of sheds we have mentioned above. They have enough space that one can accommodate outdoor tools and still carry out activities. They can be used as offices. However, if used as an office, one will have to be careful while carrying out their activities to avoid substances that may hurt or prick them as they are moving around.
The roof trusses support the plywood and shingles that make the roof waterproof.  They are very important to plan carefully because they require strange angles and they have to fit the structure below them.  We gave our shed a slight awning and this had to be accompanied by the trusses, which overhang the walls of the shed by about a foot on each side.  When constructing your joists it is important to use joist plates otherwise the angles that you so carefully planned will not remain true for very long.  We used a 2x4 to support the joists while we were attaching them to the walls.
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Figure A (above) and Figure E show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E).
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