You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.
The toughest and most important part of building a shed is finding the right plans. Sure you can just start building without plans, but do you know how it will look when you are done? Or you can search for free plans, but are they designed right? What I recommend is finding plans, even if it means you have to pay a little. Make sure that sample plans are provided so you know what you are getting. Do not make a purchase just because they show lots of nice sheds but no sample of the actual plans you will be buying. Look for the following before you decide to purchase:
Additional options include ready-built sheds that are shipped completely assembled. Find out if these will need to be finished, sanded, and painted or stained. Prefab and already-built sheds are an attractive concept but investigate shipping costs. Consider feasibility and logistically how you'll manage the project. Some sheds are delivered by a truck equipped with a crane. Will the crane be able to drive on your property and deliver the building without tearing down walls or fences or plowing over a lawn or garden?

Step 5 – We bought the shed plans online for a mere $14.99. You can find the plans to build a shed yourself online HERE.  and due to the fact that the back wall of the shed will be up against the fence, we decided to build that first. Of course, we took another trip, yep, you guessed it. Layla was quite excited to get the wood because she has convinced herself that this is a playhouse for herself and her dolls. She expects it to be fully equipped with bunk beds and a place for her dresses. She also doesn’t want daddy to put his dirty tools in her playhouse. I think she and Brian need to work that out amongst themselves. 
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).

Figure G shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G).


My advice... Don't do-it-all-yourself. Novice and pro alike can benefit from each other in DIY. You might have the shed location leveled by a landscaper; get a referral to outsource the shed's foundation to a building subcontractor; you can even have the roof's trusses made by a local truss company and the shingles installed by a handyman or roofer.

The last thing you want is to build a shed only to discover that it’s too small to hold your stuff, handle your hobby, or otherwise meet your needs. By the same token, you don’t want a shed that’s so large it overwhelms your property and looks ungainly behind your house. Choosing the wrong size shed is a common homeowner error, but LP Outdoor Building Solutions’ handy tool helps you get it just right. Check it out, and you’ll see that size does matter!
This step by step diy project is about 10×20 gable shed plans. This shed has a beautiful designs, so it is not only for storage but also for enhancing the look of your garden. The access is easy due to the double doors on one end, and a simple door on one side. The double doors will let plenty of light inside the shed. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration. Remember that you need to select the site for the shed with attention and that you have to comply with a few legal regulations.
The front wall has a 6-foot-long top plate and two 1-foot-long bottom plates, leaving space for a 4-foot-wide door. The four wall studs are 81 1/4 inches long; install them as shown in the front framing detail at left. Next, install the 73-inch-long jack studs, and then attach the 51-inch-long doubled header. Finally, attach the 6 1/4-inch-long cripple studs.
Before a hammer hits a nail: plan, plan, and plan some more. All too often people visit local home centers to get shed ideas. They go inside the prebuilt sheds in the parking lot and decide their own storage needs right then and there. Even worse, they'll grab a few brochures and use those ideas to find a shed design online without doing any proper space planning.

Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.


Ø Clay tiled sheds — as the name suggests, these are sheds that their roofs consist of clay tiles. The clay tiles make the wooden sheds look visually appealing. Nevertheless, one has to plan for the clay tiles from the foundation of the shed so that it can support the roof due to the bulkiness of the roof. The wooden walls need to be strong enough to support the roof. It would be advisable to hire an expert to install the clay tiled roof to avoid complications.
Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F).
Make a template on the shed floor for assembling the trusses. Begin by laying out the parts for one truss. Align the bottom chord with the edge of the plywood floor. Then cut four 24-in.-long 2 x 4s. Lay two alongside each rafter and screw them to the plywood floor. Now use these short boards as stopblocks for laying out and assembling each truss. Fasten plywood gussets to each side of every truss with carpenter's glue and 1-in. roofing nails and set the trusses aside.
This is nothing but a pyramid scheme in disguise. Don't spend the first $37.00, they lead you to believe that you are getting discs and actual plans until you pay $37.00, then they tell you that you have to download everything but at an additional price. I'm calling the Fraud Department at the Texas State Attorney Generals office and reporting them.

Once you decide that adding a shed will increase the enjoyment of your outdoor space, it’s time to ask pertinent questions to assess your needs. Consider exactly how you want to use your shed, what design will best suit those tasks, and how much your budget will allow. Learn what features are most popular, and why. Also research what’s really involved with building a shed yourself, as opposed to hiring a pro to do the job, and be sure you understand such important factors as warranty and delivery.


A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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