Firewood sheds are simple sheds designed to help your firewood dry out and also keep it from getting a lot of water on the wood when it rains or snows. The simple open front design allows the wood to be easily accessible and increases air flow around the stacked wood. The floors are designed using 2x4 boards spaced 1" apart to provide plenty of strength and allow allow air to circulate up through the floor and around the wood to season it properly. The roofs are corrugated metal but they can also be roofed with asphalt shingles.


We built the Colonial-style garden shed shown here from a set of mail-order building plans. The 10 x 16-ft. outbuilding has easy-to-install plywood siding, three large windows and two pairs of doors. The entire building could be used for storage, but we decided to divide the interior space into two separate areas: a 4 x 10-ft. tool-storage area and a 10 x 12-ft. children's playroom.
I'm looking about spanning 15' for a gazebo. trying to figure out what dimension beams I need. The Gazebo will be 15'x10'. How big will the beams have to be. at 1/2 the distance on 15' I will have a perpendicular beam running to carry 2x4's running parallel to 15' beam edge. I live in California in there with be no roofing material.. I will be using redwood for lumber Thanks
• Failure to account for climate — some people build sheds without considering the weather patterns experienced in the area. The shed ends up being exposed to harsh climatic conditions, continued exposure of the shed to such adverse climatic conditions lead to its destruction. This then leads to one spending much more money to repair the shed. The most common way in which people fail to protect their sheds from is rainwater and snow by failing to have the necessary protecting tools such as gutters and drainage trenches. Gutters are important as they direct rainwater away from the shed hence protecting the shed from getting destructed by rainwater and melting snow that is on the roof. Drainage trenches direct the water that falls directly to the ground away from the shed. These methods keep the wood used to build the sheds dry and hence they do not absorb moisture that may encourage the growth of fungi on the wood. As we have seen earlier, it is also important to coat the wood with protective coats as paint to prevent them from coming into any contact with moisture.
· Gable shed — they are also common due to their stylish two-faced roof that meets at the center forming a peak. Their roof shapes are conducive as they provide adequate space, but not as much as the gambrel styled sheds. They provide adequate spaces for storage of garden tools. They also accommodate larger items as motorcycles. The property that makes these sheds become common is their stylish shape that blends in well with any compound with a house of any design.
If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
When elaborating the shed plans, take into consideration the purpose that the shed will serve. This will help you determine the suitable dimensions as well as the structure of the interior. Keep in mind that you’ll most likely want to have some shelves and a table inside the shed so you need to add these to the list of materials. You also need to take into account the tools you’ll need for the project so you can plan accordingly. You’ll probably need a saw, a drill, a shovel and a few other basic things. As far as the materials go, it all depends on the type of shed you want to build. On instructables you can find detailed instructions and lists which teach you how to built a cute shed just like this one.
I have spent a truckload of time on the same for five years by purchasing and reading Woodworking books, going through woodworking plan blueprints and understanding woodworking designs. While some of them are very detailed most of them left with questions more than answers because of the incompetency and inadequacy in the design details. I haven’t come across a single plan that had everything I needed, forget the step by step instructions.

My Shed Plans by Ryan Henderson is a comprehensive collection of over 12,000 easy to follow, step-by-step Shed and Woodworking Plans. Plus, you are getting an additional 400 Woodworking Plans. What I don’t like about My Shed Plans is I will never ever build a fraction of these Amazing Shed Plans. There is just too many Shed Plans for a weekend warrior like myself.
The slanted roof of a modern house in the San Francisco Bay Area is echoed in this small wooden tool shed. Conceived by Astrid Gaiser Garden Design, the shed becomes an interesting part of the landscape design instead of something tucked or hidden in a corner or side yard. Gaiser even added a chalkboard for kids and adults to draw and write messages.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
· Firewood storage sheds — mainly used to store firewood from elements of weather such as rainfall that may destroy them. The most common type of firewood shed is the lean on shed. It is also the most suitable as it allows free circulation of air, therefore, preventing dampness of the firewood. It is also near the house so the firewood is stored near your house and may access anytime you need them.
I'm looking about spanning 15' for a gazebo. trying to figure out what dimension beams I need. The Gazebo will be 15'x10'. How big will the beams have to be. at 1/2 the distance on 15' I will have a perpendicular beam running to carry 2x4's running parallel to 15' beam edge. I live in California in there with be no roofing material.. I will be using redwood for lumber Thanks
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
In a perfect world, all of the studs would be straight, but since they aren’t, make sure to pick the best ones to use at corners and at door and window openings. Sight down the length of the studs and set aside the ones that are perfectly straight. While you’re at it, also set aside studs that are really crooked. You can cut these up to use as cripples or blocking. You may find other uses for short pieces later on.
For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.

If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
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Because the shed is designed to abut to another structure, the foundation need only be pressure-treated skids, the roof pitched in only one direction to shed water, and the back wall sheathed with 1/2-inch CDX plywood, which withstands indirect exposure to moisture. See Anatomy of an Outdoor Shed or Playhouse for more about typical shed construction.
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