I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
My Shed Plans is the perfect package for those who do not have an ounce of knowledge regarding shed building. You will benefit from the step-by-step directions, colored illustrations, section details and the woodworking course. All techniques and tricks will be taught to you, so you’ll definitely learn a lot about building your own sheds. If you do have some natural creative ability and some skill, the sheds should turn out fine.

· Personal belongings storage shed — as you are growing older each and every day, you may tend to accumulate so many items that congest your house. You may not want to throw or give away any of the items accumulated as they probably hold a sentimental value to you. The best way in which you can solve a headache is by building yourself a shed which you can be storing your personal items as you continue accumulating them.
Are you one of those people who love woodworking and seek joy out of it? If yes, well you might already know that every woodworking project requires a certain amount of time and effort to be invested in it. In some cases, it’s almost the same as the construction projects, and many people say that building a wooden shed is synonymous to building a brick wall. Even when it’s easy and simple, you should have adequate knowledge to successfully implement the design plan.
When you start to look at the plans, you realize some are absurdly out of date, or impossible to read because they are blurred - just like everyone else has reported on this site. What was even more appalling was it appeared most, if not all of what I had purchased, was easily available for free online. Some material looked as though it may have been pilfered - or "borrowed without permission or attribution from educational sites. And much of the "VIP-Premium" content was past its copyright - which is great if you want a children's woodworking book from the 1800's for historical purposes, which I'm sure is a fascinating read, but all that was ultimately meaningless since the sum total of what I downloaded offered nothing of any immediate benefit toward building a shed from a quality, step-by-step plan, with 3-D renderings, Material lists, and best practices, etc to help you build quickly, efficiently, and have something you can use and be proud of. I think the only proprietary plans must the the freebie they give away to entice you to pony up.
3 The frame of the roof consists of four 2-by-4 rafters cut so that they rest on the front- and rear-wall top plates, as shown in the rafter detail at right. Install a gable stud directly over the center studs on both side walls to fit between the end rafter and the top plate. Install the sub-fascia and then the fascia to the front ends of the rafters.
Nothing dresses up a shed like brackets. They’re the ultimate low-effort, high-impact feature. In some cases they also provide extra support for your gable-end overhang. Depending on the design, you can build brackets from 4x4s or by laminating 2-by boards. Make a full-scale drawing to work out the details. Then build the brackets and attach them to the shed. Install the brackets tight to the underside of the overhang, and then notch the fascia board to fit over them.
This garden shed is the tiniest, but that’s the beauty of it – it’s exactly the right size to store your gardening tools. As there are more details (all in order to give you more storaging options), it might take a little longer to build this shed than the others, also the makers of the plan have said it cost around $400 to build this, but the shed is definitely one of a kind and worth the efforts.
If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
Before we can finish the base we need to get the electrical ready.  Put a peice of conduit over your electrical wire to protect it from any damage it could receive while you are finishing the base and to give the shed a more finished look.  Make sure the pipe and wire inside are pointing up perpendicular to the ground and are preferably going straight to the location where your first outlet will be.

I have spent a truckload of time on the same for five years by purchasing and reading Woodworking books, going through woodworking plan blueprints and understanding woodworking designs. While some of them are very detailed most of them left with questions more than answers because of the incompetency and inadequacy in the design details. I haven’t come across a single plan that had everything I needed, forget the step by step instructions.
• Lack of harmony — building a shed that does not match the design or the color of your house would make the compound look a bit odd. It is advisable that you choose a suitable architectural design and color that will closely match with your house. That gives your compound a great look and also makes it look like both structures were built at the same time. It also gives you a sense of satisfaction and hence you will not have to waste money in the future to make one structure resemble the other.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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