There are plenty of jobs to do out in the yard, and most of these tasks require tools and machines like weedwhackers, lawn mowers, edgers, and everything else. The garage can only hold so much, because it’s meant to store your car or cars. Heaven knows you aren’t going to be storing that equipment inside the house once you’re through with it, so an outdoor shed is necessary in every home’s backyard. It can cost a fortune to hire a woodworker or carpenter to customize an outdoor storage space for you. And if you take it upon yourself to build a shed, you’ll probably be left with nothing but frustration and problems.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)

I have recently purchased a house with an older roof that needs to be restored soon. So, I am trying to decide on I should go with a metal roof other than shingles. If I install metal roofing over solid decking such as OSB or plywood, integrate with a properly insulated garret, there is very little noise difference compared to standard asphalt shingles. I have briefly read benefits and drawbacks of Metal roofing but as I listed before I should go to metal roofing and hiring a roofing contractor no matter its expensive or noisy anyhow, Your article has cleared a lot of misinterpretation I’ve had before.
This is another shed building tip about the location of your shed. While it would be great to let your shed blend into the shrubbery on your property, but it isn’t really realistic. You want to allow your shed to breathe which means giving it space from trees, fences and shrubs. A few feet all around will let the materials breathe effectively and direct sunlight will ensure mold and mildew stay far away.
• Purchase of two small sheds — it is dangerous to underspend just as it is to overspend. This is because you may underspend and the shed purchased may end up being of little use below your expectations. This will prompt you to build another shed and that will lead you to overspend. A shed may look simple on the outside but it is how you customize your shed that will determine the volume of goods your shed can hold. When building your shed it is important you identify each and every section of your shed, allocate the tools to each section and then modify the shed to hold each and every tool at its place. In that manner, you end up maximizing each and every space in your shed and also utilizing your shed to its maximum capability. It is also recommendable to have adequately spaced sheds where one can perform outdoor activities like car repairing in the shed when the weather is not favorable. Before starting your shed building, think of all its purposes and all the outdoor and semi-outdoor activities one could perform during unfavorable weather condition or any other related circumstances.
Each truss is made up of two 2 x 4 rafters and one 2 x 4 ceiling joist. The three boards are joined together with 1/2-in. plywood gussets. To speed up the assembly process, build all the trusses on the shed floor before erecting the walls. Start by cutting all the rafters to length with a 40° angle at one end of each. Cut 2 x 4s to 10 ft. long for the bottom chords of the trusses. Also, cut all of the plywood gussets.

Build the framework for all four walls. To account for the fact that the front and back walls are different from each other (due to the doorframe in the front) and the side walls must both be sloped (to prevent rain from collecting on the roof), each of these will have to be tackled somewhat differently. It’s easiest to construct the back first, the front second, and the two sides last, as shown in the numbered image below. See How to Frame a Wall for more information before you read the instructions below.[5]

how to build a shed

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