No shed, regardless of how well it's built, will last long if it's set on a weak base. Most sheds can be supported by an on-grade foundation, which consists of solid concrete blocks or pressure-treated wood timbers set directly on the ground. The concrete blocks or timbers (aka skids) must be leveled and spaced closely enough to properly support the shed's floor frame. Note that it's important to use solid concrete blocks, not hollow wall blocks, which can easily crack.

I would advise you to aim for the type of wood that is resistant to deforming, fading, pets and dampness. Once at a local lumberyard, request for the heartwood, which is the innermost part of the wood in a tree. Unlike sapwood which is the outer most wood found in a tree, it is resistant to harsh conditions. The following species of wood are suitable for shed building: Cedar, Cyprus, and Redwood. Before buying the wood, check thoroughly that it has been well processed. Be cautious of wet wood to avoid shrinkage after you have already bought it and also Greenwood which may cause you inconveniences. The most common type of outdoor wood is pressure treated and consists of pine and fir.
Then, you will need to install a series of floor joists across the entire length of the support beams; these will need to be the same length as the distance between the two rim joints so that they’ll fit between them. In the example design, the floor joists are all separated by 14.5-inch gaps except for the outermost two, which are 13 3⁄4 inches (34.9 cm) from their immediate neighbors; this is to allow a standard piece of plywood to line up with the outermost edge of the outermost joist but only cover half of an interior joist, allowing its neighbor to cover the other half so that both can be supported properly.[3]
In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.
This 8×15 shed from Lifetime is entirely constructed in the USA, and comes equipped with two shatter proof windows, shutters, and side entry with 6 skylights for stunning illumination within. The powder coated steal A frame roof trusses and reinforced steel internal wall structure are made of durable polyethylene. The high grade metal screws make it incredibly easy to assemble this shed. Additional airflow is provided by the peak screen vent cap. You also get the added benefit of UV-protection that helps to prevent fading and cracking over time. This storage unit can be used year-round and comes with a fantastic 10 year limited warranty from the manufacturer. The floor of this unit is built so tough that it will never crack, peel, or chip. It’s also slip-resistant and resistant against stains, oils, and solvents. All in all, this is a fantastic shed for those looking for something that is built tough and built to last.
As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.
These plans are for saltbox roof style sheds.  They are built with trusses that you build.  These sheds are perfect for general storage, garden sheds, tool sheds, potting sheds, playhouses and more.  This shed in my opinion, if you are wanting to build a shed for gardening, this is the one.  It has lots of charm and character with it's desirable design.

I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
Are you one of those people who love woodworking and seek joy out of it? If yes, well you might already know that every woodworking project requires a certain amount of time and effort to be invested in it. In some cases, it’s almost the same as the construction projects, and many people say that building a wooden shed is synonymous to building a brick wall. Even when it’s easy and simple, you should have adequate knowledge to successfully implement the design plan.
If you need lots of space for storage, garden room, or office space, the most common design will be the gable shed. The gable roof design has two sloped roof that resembles a little house. This design is the most popular because it blends will with your home. The gambrel shed resembles a barn. It is great for storage as no space will go to waste. A larger size gambrel shed will have enough room to build a loft. Having a loft will keep everything organized and allow you to store more stuff. By installing a ramp to the shed you can also store ATV, snowmobiles, jet skis, trailers, and such things.
These plans are for saltbox roof style sheds.  They are built with trusses that you build.  These sheds are perfect for general storage, garden sheds, tool sheds, potting sheds, playhouses and more.  This shed in my opinion, if you are wanting to build a shed for gardening, this is the one.  It has lots of charm and character with it's desirable design.
Because My Shed Plans does not promise anything beyond belief, the product’s foundation is pretty strong. People have enjoyed choosing between the collections of shed layouts and building it themselves. It’s a great activity for the whole family, since it’s all well planned out. It can be a bonding experience, the way a team building exercise at work is.

Our wood greenhouse shed plans have lots of windows and use clear polycarbonate roofing that lets in plenty of light to keep your plants happy and green. Several designs use the same doors that are installed on residential homes to keep construction simple and allow the door to have a glass panel to let in even more sunlight. The floors are made using 2x6 pressure treated wood so plants can be watered inside without the worry of damaging the floor.


The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
There are many types of roof design that you can use to add to your shed. But since you are a beginner, I would advise you to build a simple roof structure so as to avoid the frustrations that can come with building complex roof structures. Complex roof structures also require additional tools and greats skills hence, it is time consuming and a bit expensive compared to the simple roof structure.
I like to use the hip roof design, it is pleasing to the eye, it is the best roof for high winds, certainlly a good idea with the hurricanes and tropical storms found in South Florida. I always build my sheds on a raised concrete slab for stability, I also use double hurricane ties. All studs and rafters are pressure treated because of the area's termite problems. I always anchor the shed to the concrete slab with expoy bolts. I never use T11 siding it does not hold up well in a subtropical climate. I use OSB under the siding and I often cross brace. I prefer a metal roof screwed down not nailed using water gasket screws. I generally use ridge vents or a wind turbine to help cool the shed and I also use Bahama shutters for the same reason. I build with rafters not trusses so I can keep the celling open to also cool the shed. This makes the shed expensive but after twenty years of use one of my oldest sheds which received proper up keep is still perfect. So which is cheaper one shed for life or one after every major windstorm? I know the answer because I had one shed stand up to a huricane!
High-quality materials may cost a bit more, but they’ll save you time, trouble, and money in the long run. The chart here shows how LP® SmartSide® Panels compare with untreated plywood, vinyl, and galvanized metal. No wonder so many pros recommend sheds made with beautiful, durable LP products! If you want your shed to resist splitting, cracking, decay, and termite damage while duplicating the good looks of rich, real cedar, choose LP SmartSide® products.
Ø Large sheds — they are larger in size compared to the other type of sheds we have mentioned above. They have enough space that one can accommodate outdoor tools and still carry out activities. They can be used as offices. However, if used as an office, one will have to be careful while carrying out their activities to avoid substances that may hurt or prick them as they are moving around.
You can cut steel roofing panels with a circular saw and a carbide blade, but it’ll save you a lot of work if you order the panels the right length to start with. Plus, you’ll have a greater color selection if you order the roofing rather than buy off-the-shelf panels. Remember to order in advance, though, since it usually takes several weeks for the roofing to arrive. And make sure the overhangs are the right size so the panels will overhang the fascia slightly.

As you can see, I have no pictures of the doors being created.  This is because they took way too much trouble to make, and I didn't really have the patience to take pictures of them being built because they were tested and redone about 3 times.  Lesson to be learned:  leave the tolerances bigger than you think they will need to be, you can always use weather strips to help close them up later.  After 3 attempts, we finnally got the doors to work properly.  The one door is held in place with sliding dead-bolts to the floor and ceiling frames and the second door is attached to it with another dead-bolt.
A thing you might want to check is if regulations require a minimum setback from the property line. This is often overlooked and come back to bite you. A silly thing I found out when I built my shed, my jurisdiction in California treats buildings differently depending on what they are called on the permit. I called my shed a barn because I built a gambrel roof and it looked like a barn. My surprise....A barn must be 50 feet away from any structures occupied by humans. A shed can be almost against the house.....same size, same shape,,,just different names.
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